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My object has a call back:

var MyObject = {
CallBack: "function (whichSubMenuIsClicked, subMenuObjectTag) { self.doStuff(whichSubMenuIsClicked.SubMenuItem, whichSubMenuIsClicked.HeaderColumnName, whichSubMenuIsClicked.DivIdentifier);}",
}

The callback is a string. Now I need to execute it using MyObject.CallBack(param1, param2) How can this be done using jquery or javascript. The self in this case is the original widget calling another widget. Thus the call back is on the original widget.

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1  
WTH would you write a function as a string if it shell be used as a function? –  Bergi Nov 23 '12 at 14:13
1  
In case not all the answers are clear, you should not be doing this. If you are receiving a function in JSON and therefore it needs to be a string, then you shouldn't be receiving a function in JSON. This approach needs to be reconsidered. It is inefficient and, as with any use of eval, insecure. –  zetlen Nov 23 '12 at 14:19
    
@zetlen: It is only insecure when the source of the string can't be trusted - as with every script. Also have a look at When is eval() not evil? –  Bergi Nov 23 '12 at 14:35
    
@Bergi you are absolutely right. Opening up a new execution context has its own security problems, but they are edge cases compared to the overall problems with running any untrusted code. –  zetlen Nov 23 '12 at 15:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use the Function constructor, which accepts a list of parameter names followed by the function body:

var MyObject = {
    CallBack: "self.doStuff(whichSubMenuIsClicked.SubMenuItem, whichSubMenuIsClicked.HeaderColumnName, whichSubMenuIsClicked.DivIdentifier)",
};

var myfunc = new Function("whichSubMenuIsClicked", "subMenuObjectTag", MyObject.CallBack);
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Just don't have the function as a string.

Have the function as a function:

var MyObject = {
   CallBack: function (whichSubMenuIsClicked, subMenuObjectTag) {
                  self.doStuff(whichSubMenuIsClicked.SubMenuItem, whichSubMenuIsClicked.HeaderColumnName, whichSubMenuIsClicked.DivIdentifier);
             }
}
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You should write the function as a function, as @Curt demonstrated. Only if you really have no other choice than getting it as a string (e.g. from user input), you would first need to parse it to executable code which you then could call. The way to do so is eval. A problem will become the reference self, which is not a variable inside your function and would be assumed global. Yet, you can use a with statement to work around that:

var MyObject = {
    CallBack: "function (whichSubMenuIsClicked, subMenuObjectTag) { self.doStuff(whichSubMenuIsClicked.SubMenuItem, whichSubMenuIsClicked.HeaderColumnName, whichSubMenuIsClicked.DivIdentifier);}",
};
var widget = {doStuff: console.log};
var fn;
with( {self: widget} ) {
    fn = eval( MyObject.CallBack );
}
fn({SubMenuItem: "…", HeaderColumnName: "…", DivIdentifier: "…"});
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You don't need eval, the Function constructor is purpose built for this. –  Asad Nov 23 '12 at 14:26
    
@Asad: Is it? Where is the difference? Also, the OP already has a full function string, and not a parameter list + function body code. Also, the Function constructor does not seem to be able to handle the self variable. –  Bergi Nov 23 '12 at 14:29
    
The difference is that the Function constructor will never execute any statements passed to to it, whereas the eval function would execute any malicious statements sneaked in. This is pretty much the entire point behind the hubbub over the use of eval. I'm not sure what you mean by "handling the self variable". –  Asad Nov 23 '12 at 14:34
    
Of course Function does not execute any line of code - only you execute the resulting function. And malicious statements could be "sneaked" into a function body as well, there's no difference. –  Bergi Nov 23 '12 at 14:38
    
Here's the difference: eval('function(){};alert("LOL")') vs. new Function('//note that you can't sneak in code that will be immediately executed') –  Asad Nov 23 '12 at 14:40

Very bad approach but You can do it by eval()

var MyObject = { CallBack: "AName = function(param1, param2) { alert(param1 + param2); }", }

eval(MyObject.CallBack+"(1,2)"); 

Demo

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2  
If the only solution to your problem is eval, change the problem. –  Rory McCrossan Nov 23 '12 at 14:13
    
@RoryMcCrossan, "Never" really? –  Starx Nov 23 '12 at 14:14
    
@RoryMcCrossan You certainly don't have to use it here, but there are indeed times when eval is useful. Metaprogramming, for instance! –  zetlen Nov 23 '12 at 14:14
    
@Starx yup never. I edited my comment as you changed your answer, but you should never use eval. –  Rory McCrossan Nov 23 '12 at 14:14
1  
Doesn't deserve a downvote; yes eval is terrible, but this answers the OP's question. –  Jeffrey Sweeney Nov 23 '12 at 14:16

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