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I'm writing a small program that uses a certain percentage of CPU. The basic strategy is that I will continuously check the CPU usage, and make the process sleep if the level of usage is higher than the given value.

Moreover, since I'm using MacOS(no proc/stat like Linux, no PerformanceCounter in C#), I have to execute top command in another thread and get the CPU usage from it.

The problem is I keep getting a very high usage of CPU even I give a small value as argument. And after several experiments, it seems caused by shared field by multithreads.

Here are my code(code 1) and experiments:

(code 2)Initially I thought it is the shell commands make the usage very high, so I commented the infinite loop in run(), leaving only the getCpuUsage() running. However, the CPU usage is nearly zero.

(code 3)Then, I wrote another run() function independent from the cpuUsage, which is intended to use 50% of CPU. It works well! I think the only difference between code 1 and code 3 is the usage of cpuUsage. So I'm wondering if sharing field between threads will use CPU a lot?

code 1

const char CPU_COMMAND[] = "top -stats cpu -l 1 -n 0| grep CPU\\ usage | cut -c 12-15";

int cpuUsage; // shared field that stores the cpu usage

// thread that continuously check CPU usage
// and store it in cpuUsage
void getCpuUsage() {
    char usage[3];
    FILE *out;
    while (1) {
        out = popen(CPU_COMMAND, "r");
        if (fgets(usage, 3, out) != NULL) {
            cpuUsage = atof(usage);
        } else {
            cpuUsage = 0;
        }
        pclose(out);
    }
}

// keep the CPU usage under ratio
void run(int ratio) {
    pthread_t id;
    int ret = pthread_create(&id, NULL, (void *)getCpuUsage, NULL);
    if (ret!=0) printf("thread error!");

    while (1) {
        // if current cpu usage is higher than ration, make it asleep
        if (cpuUsage > ratio) {
            usleep(10);
        }
    }

    pthread_join(id, NULL);
}

code 2

// keep the CPU usage under ratio
void run(int ratio) {
    pthread_t id;
    int ret = pthread_create(&id, NULL, (void *)getCpuUsage, NULL);
    if (ret!=0) printf("thread error!");

    /*while (1) {
        // if current cpu usage is higher than ration, make it asleep
        if (cpuUsage > ratio) {
            usleep(10);
        }
    }*/

    pthread_join(id, NULL);
}

code 3

void run() {
    const clock_t busyTime = 10;
    const clock_t idleTime = busyTime;

    while (1) {
        clock_t startTime = clock();
        while (clock() - startTime <= busyTime);
        usleep(idleTime);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
sleep doesn't stop CPU usage from a thread. –  Marrow Gnawer Nov 23 '12 at 15:14
    
@MarrowGnower but the third version of my code works well, indicating that the usleep() does stop CPU usage. –  POPOL Nov 23 '12 at 15:22
    
BTW, POSIX does not allow a memory location to be concurrently read and written by multiple threads of control - "Applications shall ensure that access to any memory location by more than one thread of control (threads or processes) is restricted such that no thread of control can read or modify a memory location while another thread of control may be modifying it." –  chill Nov 23 '12 at 15:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Does shared field in multithreading C program use CPU a lot?

Yes, constant reads/writes to/from a shared memory locations, by multiple threads on multiple CPUs cause a cache line to constantly move between CPUs (cache bounce). IMO, it's the single most important reason for poor scalability in naive "parallel" applications.

share|improve this answer

Ok. Code1 creates a thread which -as fast as possible- does a popen. So this thread uses up all the cpu-time. the other thread (main-thread) does usleep's, but not the popening thread...

Code2 also starts this cpu-using thread and then waits for it to finish (join), which will never happen.

Code3 runs for a while, then sleeps the same amount, so it should use up around 50%.

So basically what you should do (if you really want to use top for that purpose), you call it, then sleep for lets say 1 second, or 100ms, and see wether your main-loop in code1 adjusts.

while (1) {
    usleep (100*1000);
    out = popen(CPU_COMMAND, "r");
share|improve this answer
    
the getUsage() function is kept while the run() changes. So code 2 can prove that getUsage() doewn't use much cpu-time. –  POPOL Nov 23 '12 at 16:13

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