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I have two classes:

public abstract class A extends JPanel {

    @Override
    public void repaint() {
        super.repaint();
        //my own implementation of A repaint
    }

    private void method2() {
         //I need to call the repaint method of A here
    }

}

public class B extends A {

    @Override
    public void repaint() {
        super.repaint();
        //my own implementation of B repaint
    }
}

In a brief search I've found out that there is no way to call a base overridden method from the base class, the problem is, how can I call the repaint method of A inside A? I know that a could create the base method, and another method explicitly to be extended as is mentioned here, but, since is a method that has to be common to all of the children in order to follow the java design pattern, and the most important thing of all, if another programmer continues my work, he would be searching for the repaint method, any suggestion to do this?

Edit: I'm sorry, I forgot to mention that class A is abstract, so all the instances of A are also B (and imagine, there are more children of A classes , so I can't do the implementation entirely in B, because I need that behavior in all the children of A), also, I need this because I need to refresh the view of A in certain parts of the execution, but I just want to paint the respective part of A without refreshing the ones of the children.

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3 Answers 3

I suggest you don't override the repaint() method. What you probably want to do is to actually override the paint(Graphics g) method.

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I understand why do you say that, I've already do that, the thing is that I want to refresh the panel at certain time of my execution, (and java recommends to do not call the paintComponent method (that works, but it is just not fine, (I know you are not recommending me to do that either)) –  Ordiel Nov 23 '12 at 15:28
    
Just override the paint or the paintComponent method and call repaint(). That's the way it works. –  Dan Nov 23 '12 at 15:35
    
yes, but wen I call repaint in A I want just the paintComponent of A to be called not the one of A and B, and that is what is happening when I call repaint on A and I don't want that to append, how can I achieve that? –  Ordiel Nov 23 '12 at 15:42
public abstract class A extends JFrame {

    @Override
    public void repaint() {
        myRepaint();
    }

    private void myRepaint() {
        super.repaint();
        //my own implementation of A repaint
    }

    private void method2() {
         myRepaint();
    }

}

public class B extends A {

    @Override
    public void repaint() {
        super.repaint();
        //my own implementation of B repaint
    }
}
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Not being able to explicitly call your impl is a good thing. It allows subclasses to change the impl to their own need. Allowing it would undermine the whole OO design of java.

However, you could do this:

public void repaint() {
    repaintImpl();
}

private void repaintImpl() {
    // whatever
}

and call repaintImpl() where you want to "call the base repaint method".

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