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I have a solution with two projects each producing a separate dll that is used by another windows application. Each of those projects has a class called MyActions with only one method like so

Project1

   public class MyActions
    {
        public SomeTypeA DoJob(string str1, string str2)
        {
        }
    }

Project 2

   public class MyActions
    {
        public SomeTypeB DoJob(string str1)
        {
        }
    }

The two return types of these two classes are as below

    public class SomeTypeA 
    {
         public string stringA { get; set; }
         public int someInt { get; set; }
    }


public class SomeTypeB 
{
     public string someStringA { get; set; }

}

The method DoJob in the both the classes of these individual projects have almost 80% code that is the same. Project1 is the one whose MyActions class's DoJob method has some extra bits specific to only Project1. Now here is the twist.. Project1 is eventually going to be scrapped and its dll will no longer be used.I want to write the code in the best possible way that ensures there is no repeat of code and so that I dont have to make any modifications to remove any un-required code in Project2 once Project1 is discontinued.

I was thinking of using inheritance and overriding the DoJob method. How would that work if their return types are different and they have different input parameters? Perhaps push one of the parameters from Project1's MyActions class to its constructor? I was also thinking of adding a link to Project2's MyActions class in Project1. But not sure about how to go ahead with implementing that and not repeating myself or possibly running into unforeseen problems later. Any tips, suggestions?

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1  
If those methods accept different parameters, and return different types, then I feel they are different. Do you have a more real-world example? How are these classes logically related? –  Matthew Nov 23 '12 at 15:30
    
there is X lines of code which is exactly the same.. line for line in both the class's methods.. Project1 has X + 5% more that is only specific to Project1. Both classes work on a document of the same type and perform the same actions on it...with the exception of Project1 that does a few other jobs more. Its those X lines of exact duplicate code that bother me. –  user20358 Nov 23 '12 at 15:40
    
@user20358 Can you move those code blocks to a separate utility class? Something MyDocumentFinder or MyDocumentWriter (hard to say what exactly) and pass in key information to those methods/objects whose purpose is to do one small unit task? –  Chris Sinclair Nov 23 '12 at 15:42
    
You could also wrap the 'common part' in another method, and call it from each DoJob implementation. You can 'adapt' the common part of both classes in a new one, and use an instance of it when calling the code that is almost the same in both methods –  Daniel Castro Nov 23 '12 at 15:45
    
@DanielCastro That would make Project2's MyAction class's DoJob method just a wrapper around this other classes method. what if I go the Inheritance route? so that Project1's Myactions class inherits from Project2's MyAction class and then just calls base.Dojob after doing its own Project1 specific actions? –  user20358 Nov 23 '12 at 15:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your thought about inheritance is a good one. From your question in read between the lines that you were considering to let Project 1 inherit from Project 2. That's a possibility but probably not the best solution. Here is what I would suggest.

Create a super class for MyActions that both projects extend. Into this class you can move all the code that is shared across both projects (your 80% code of the method). The specific implementations in your MyAction in each project then implement the DoJob method as needed and make use of the provided methods from the super class.

Once you scrap project 1 there will be no changes that have to be made to project 2's code. You end up with a super class though that you do not really need any more in that case. However you won't be repeating yourself anywhere.

I am not yet familiar with the exact differences between java and C# so bear with me if there are differences. This is what code might look like in java.

abstract class AbstractMyActions {

    protected SomeType commonMethodForBothProjects() {
        ...
    }
}

public class MyActionsA extends AbstractMyActions {

     public SomeType doJob(SomeParameter ..., SomeParameter ...) {
         $this->commonMethodForBothProjects();
         // Additional steps
     }
}

You get the idea.

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If (and only if) the parameters and the return types of the two methods in the two classes are actually different, factor out the code that is line-for-line identical, assuming it is one block, and just create a static method in a new static class, passing the parameters necessary for the common code.

If there are multiple blocks, just have multiple methods.

Call these methods as appropriate from each of the original methods.

If you wanted to create a hierarchical relationship between these classes, which you should only do if it is logical to do so, just make them both inherit a common type, and make the method above a protected method of that common class. Then just call it from the original methods.

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public class MyActions
{
    public ISomeType DoJob(ISomeParam item)
    {
    }
}

public class SomeTypeA : ISomeType 
public class SomeTypeB : ISomeType 
share|improve this answer
    
what about Project1 having different input parameters and some extra code in the DoJob method. –  user20358 Nov 23 '12 at 15:41
    
create interface ISomeParam and special classes, implement interface in classes, put business logic to this classes –  burning_LEGION Nov 23 '12 at 15:44

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