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I'm currently writing a class for a game I'm working on that controls application routing based on hash changes in the page URL.

My problem is that the context of "this" changes to "window" after attaching the main routing function to the hashchange event.

Here is the code so far:

Game.Router = function() {

return {

    init: function() {

        window.addEventListener('hashchange', this.route, false);

    },

    route: function(e) {

        e.preventDefault();
        var routingLocation = e.newURL.substr(e.newURL.indexOf('#!/') + 3, e.newURL.length);

        switch(routingLocation) {
            case "new":
                this.toggleView('Game');
                break;
            case "instructions":
                this.toggleView('Instructions');
                break;
            case "scores":
                this.toggleView('Scores');
                break;
            case "about":
                this.toggleView('About');
                break;
        }

    },

    toggleView: function(viewID) {

        var els = document.querySelectorAll('section');
        for(var i=0, l=els.length; i<l; i++) {
            if(els[i].id == viewID) {
                els[i].className = 'currentGameSection';
            } else {
                els[i].className = '';
            }
        }

    }

}

}();

When I try and call this.toggleView in the route function's switch statement, it turns out that "this" has changed from Game.Router to window. The problem can be fixed by replacing this.toggleView with Game.Router.toggleView, but this isn't ideal.

Could someone please help me understand why the "this" context changes after adding the event listener?

share|improve this question
2  
This is one of the most duplicated question on SO. Rather than looking for an exact duplicate I can suggest to read this : stackoverflow.com/questions/1085674/… – Denys Séguret Nov 23 '12 at 15:44
    
Yeah, I had a feeling it might be. Searching turned up nothing useful though... – thesonglessbird Nov 23 '12 at 15:59
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I hope the link I gave makes the reason of your problem clear.

In order not to give the usual closure solution, here's a simpler one (not compatible with IE8-) :

 window.addEventListener('hashchange', this.route.bind(this), false);
share|improve this answer
1  
addEventListener isn't compatible with IE8 either, so it's really a non-issue. :-) Only browser I know of that supported aEL but not .bind is Safari 5.1.4 and lower. – I Hate Lazy Nov 23 '12 at 16:03
    
Thanks, this is the solution that ended up working best for me :) – thesonglessbird Nov 23 '12 at 16:05
1  
@user1689607 I hadn't thought about this. Thanks (and +1) – Denys Séguret Nov 23 '12 at 16:07

Since you're using addEventListener, just add a handleEvent method to the object, and pass the object instead of the handler.

Game.Router = function() {

    return {
          // vv--- add this
        handleEvent: function(e) {
            if (e.type === "hashchange")
                return this.route();
        },

        init: function() {
                             // pass the object---vv
            window.addEventListener('hashchange', this, false);
        },

        route: function(e) {
            // your route code
        },

        toggleView: function(viewID) {
            // your toggleView code
        }
    }
}();

What this does is that it causes the object to implement the EventListener interface. Therefore the object itself becomes a valid event handler, and can be passed to addEventListener instead of a function.

So when any even occurs, the handleEvent method will be invoked. You can test for the .type to see which event it was.

The this value in handleEvent will be the object, which gives you direct access to its methods.


This technique is also useful if you're using a constructor function, because you can just prototype the handleEvent with the other methods, and all objects that inherit that prototype will implement the EventListener interface.


If you were to use a closure, I'd put the closed-over variable in the Game.Router function so any and all methods can take advantage of it.

Game.Router = function() {
    var self = this;
    return self = {
        init: function() { // using 'self' in case 'init' becomes detached
            window.addEventListener('hashchange', self.route, false);
        },

        route: function(e) {
            // use 'self' to refer to the object
        },

        toggleView: function(viewID) {
            // use 'self' to refer to the object
        }
    }
}();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the explanation...I wasn't aware of handleEvent. Should come in useful for the future! – thesonglessbird Nov 23 '12 at 16:06
    
@thesonglessbird: You're welcome. It's not a well known feature of addEventListener, but is extremely useful, especially if you're using a constructor to create many instances of an object. – I Hate Lazy Nov 23 '12 at 16:07

You need to use a closure:

route: (function(context){
    return function(e){

        //your original function, but with all
        //references to this changed to
        //context

    }
})(this),
share|improve this answer
1  
If one was to use a closure for this, I think you might as well take advantage of the existing closure created by Game.Router by first assigning the object to a variable before returning it. This would handle any this issues for all the methods. – I Hate Lazy Nov 23 '12 at 16:06

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