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I'm trying to use promises with nodejs (I'm trying with node-promise package); however, without any success. See the code below:

var express = require('express'),
    request = require('request'),
    promise = require('node-promise');

app.get('/promise', function(req, res) {
    var length = -1;

    new promise.Promise(request(
        {uri: "http://www.bing.com"},
        function (error, response, body) {
            if (error && response.statusCode !== 200) {
                console.log("An error occurred when connected to the web site");
                return;
            }

            console.log("I'll return: " + body.length);
            length = body.length;
        }
    )).then(function(result) {
        console.log("This is what I got: " + length);
        console.log("Done!");
    });

    res.end();
});

The output of the above code is I'll return: 35857 only and it doesn't go to the then part.

I change the code then to be:

app.get('/promise', function(req, res) {
    var length = -1;

    promise.when(
        request(
            {uri: "http://www.bing.com"},
            function (error, response, body) {
                if (error && response.statusCode !== 200) {
                    console.log("An error occurred when connected to the web site");
                    return;
                }

                console.log("I'll return: " + body.length);
                length = body.length;
            }
        ),
        function(result) {
            console.log("This is what I got: " + length);
            console.log("Done!");
        },
        function(error) {
            console.log(error);
        }
    );

    res.end();
});

This time the output is This is what I got: -1 then Done!... looks like the "promise" was not called this time.

So:

  • What's needed to be done to fix the code above? Obviously I'm not doing it right :)
  • Is node-promise "the way to go" when I'm doing promises, or is there a better way/package? i.e. simpler and more production-ready.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
node-promise is the product of a very muddled mind. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Dec 22 '12 at 4:13
    
@Beetroot-Beetroot, so what's the alternative? –  TheBlueSky Dec 22 '12 at 7:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try jquery-deferred-for-node.

I'm not an expert but understand that this lib tends to be favoured by programmers who work both server-side and client-side.

Even if you don't already know jQuery's Deferreds, the advantages of going this route are that :

  • the documentation is excellent (it comprises links to the jQuery docs), though you may struggle to find examples specific to Node.

  • methods are chainable.

  • jQuery Callbacks are also included.

  • when one day you need to do asynchronous stuff client-side, then there's virtually nothing to relearn - the concepts are identical and the syntax very nearly so. See the "Correspondances" section in the github page hyperlinked above.

EDIT

I'm not a node.js person so I'm guessing here but based on your code above, you might want to consider something along the following lines with jquery-deferred-for-node :

var express = require('express'),
    request = require('request'),
    Deferred = require('JQDeferred');

function fetch(uri, goodCodes) {
    goodCodes = (!goodCodes) ? [200] : goodCodes;

    var dfrd = Deferred(); // A Deferred to be resolved/rejected in response to the `request()`.
    request(uri, function(error, response, body) {
        if (!error) {
            var isGood = false;

            // Loop to test response.statusCode against `goodCodes`.
            for (var i = 0; i < goodCodes.length; i++) {
                if (response.statusCode == goodCodes[i]) {
                    isGood = true;
                    break;
                }
            }

            if (isGood) {
                dfrd.resolve(response.statusCode, body);
            } else {
                dfrd.reject(response.statusCode, "An invalid response was received from " + uri);
            }
        } else {
            dfrd.reject(response.statusCode, "An error occurred attempting to connect to " + uri);
        }
    });

    // Make promise derived from dfrd available to "consumer".
    return dfrd.promise();
};

//...

app.get('/promise', function(req, resp) {
    fetch("http://www.bing.com").done(function(statusCode, result) {
        console.log("Done! This is what I got: " + result.length);
    }).fail(function(statusCode, message) {
        console.log("Error (" + statusCode + "): " + message);
    });
    resp.end();
};

Here, I have tried to write a generalized utility for fetching a resource in such a way that the asynchronous response (or error) can be handled externally. I think this is broadly along the lines of what you were trying to achieve.

Out of interest, where do console.log() messages end up with node.js?

EDIT 2

Above, I have given Deferred an initial capital, as is conventional for Constructors

With jQuery Deferreds, there must be any number of ways to fetch() consecutively. The approach below leaves fetch() as it was, and introduces fetch_() to act as its front-end. There may be simpler ways but this allows fetch() to remain a general utility, functionally equivalent to the client-side jQuery.ajax().

function fetch_(uri){
    return function(){
        return fetch(uri, [200]).then(function(statusCode, result){
            console.log("Done! This is what I got: " + result.length);
        },function(statusCode, message){
            console.log("Error (" + statusCode + "): " + message);
        });
    };
}

Note that function fetch() returns a function. It has to be like this because where fetch() is called, we want an unexecuted function, not (yet) the result of that function.

Now let's assume an array of uris is available. This can be hard-coded or built dynamically - whatever the application demands.

var uris = [
    'http://www.xxx.com',
    'http://www.yyy.com',
    'http://www.zzz.com'
];

And now, a variety of ways in which fetch_() might be called :

//v1. To call `resp.end()` when the fetching process starts.
app.get('/promise', function(req, resp) {
    fetch_(uris[0])().then(fetch_(uris[1])).then(fetch_(uris[2]));
    resp.end();
});

//v2. To call `resp.end()` when the fetching process has finished.
app.get('/promise', function(req, resp){
    fetch_(uris[0])().then(fetch_(uris[1])).then(fetch_(uris[2])).always(resp.end);
});

//v3. As v2 but building a `.then()` chain of any (unknown) length.
app.get('/promise', function(req, resp){
    var dfrd = Deferred().resolve();//
    $.each(uris, function(i, uri){
        dfrd = dfrd.then(fetch_(uri));
    });
    dfrd = dfrd.always(resp.end);
});

untested

I have more confidence in v1 and v2. v3 may work.

v2 and v3 should both give exactly the same behaviour but v3 is generalized for any number of uris.

Everything may need debugging.

share|improve this answer
    
See edit above. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Dec 22 '12 at 11:44
    
You really think the jQuery Deferred Documentation is good? Or do you have an other reference? –  Bergi Dec 22 '12 at 12:03
    
@Bergi, maybe I just got used to it but yes, I find it pretty good. Compared to the node-promise documentation, it's a literary masterpiece. Possible improvements improvement would be a table summarising the differences between Deferreds and Promises and a clearer introduction to explain that these are the basic building blocks. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Dec 22 '12 at 17:14
    
... Possible improvements would be ... –  Beetroot-Beetroot Dec 22 '12 at 17:23
    
Yeah, the node-promise readme is quite bad. Still, for jQuery I'm missing a technical exact reference for callbacks (with contexts and multiple arguments, for example) - I always have to look it up in the code. Also, the doc for .then is not updated to its current behavior (pipe). –  Bergi Dec 22 '12 at 19:13

I would recommend using Q: https://github.com/kriskowal/q. I believe that it's used internally by other frameworks (like jQuery deferred implementation).

I believe that the documentation is "fine"; the syntax is consistent with other promise implementations... and it has a node adapter.

So your deferred style approach:

var deferred = Q.defer();
FS.readFile("foo.txt", "utf-8", function (err, res) {
    if (!err) {
        deferred.resolve(res);
    } else {
        deferred.reject(err);
    }
});
return deferred.promise;

Can be written more concisely as:

var deferred = Q.defer();
FS.readFile("foo.txt", "utf-8", deferred.makeNodeResolver());
return deferred.promise;
share|improve this answer

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