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What is the difference between the heap usage (Allocated) we can see in the Elipse Memory Analysis Tool (in the DDMS view) and the memory usage size for the same App shown here on the Android device?:

Settings->Apps->Running

Even though I aggressively tried to preserve memory by making objects null as soon as they weren't needed, the latter number (memory usage size on Running apps screen) only kept increasing and my app finally crashed due to OutOfMemoryError. However, the former showed me that I was well within a reasonable size. I was also calling System.gc() a lot. Is there a difference between the two? Why the discrepancy? Any ideas on how I can solve this problem?

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On which Android version are you testing this on? Are you working with Bitmaps? –  Amokrane Chentir Nov 23 '12 at 16:56
    
I'm working actually working on ICS, but try to maintain as much backward compatibility. Yes, I am working with Bitmaps, and that is my fear - aren't those supposed to be cleared when the Activity exits? How about after explicit GC? If not, should I do this manually? How? Anyways, the Bitmaps I'm using aren't large files - do they increase in size after rendition? –  Divyansh Goenka Nov 24 '12 at 4:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The biggest difference between the two that I know of is the scope of garbage collection.

Normal garbage collection, including System.gc(), collects a bit of garbage, then stops. It is not a complete sweep of the heap to get rid of everything. That is to try to minimize the CPU impact of garbage collection.

The heap dump prepared for MAT, though, effectively a complete GC.

Your symptoms suggest that you are allocating memory faster than GC can reclaim it. The primary solution for this is to try to allocate less memory, or allocate it less frequently. For example, where possible, reuse objects, bitmap buffers, and the like, instead of trying to let GC clean the old stuff and allocating new stuff as you go.

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Actually, more specifically, I have some activity (class) member objects that I use mostly, and these ought be GCed as soon as he method returns, right? But it is not completly so - that memory only keeps increasing, even though I additionally make them null. –  Divyansh Goenka Nov 23 '12 at 16:58
    
@DivyanshGoenka: "I have some activity (class) member objects that I use mostly, and these ought be GCed as soon as he method returns, right?" -- non-static data members of activities are eligible for GC once the activity is destroyed. I have no idea what "as soon as he method returns" means. –  CommonsWare Nov 23 '12 at 17:29
    
sorry, a just a typo. I meant that I generally try to limit to scope of my members as much as possible, so that they are GCed faster. When this didn't happen, I even started making them null at the end of the scope, thinking that might help. However, this was not the case. There is huge difference between the two numbers I described in my question. Could it be possible (although I don't think so) that explicit GC is actually spoiling it? Is there any way to get a complete sweep like you said explicitly? –  Divyansh Goenka Nov 24 '12 at 4:10
    
@DivyanshGoenka: "Could it be possible (although I don't think so) that explicit GC is actually spoiling it?" -- I am not aware that this is the case, but you could test it simply by commenting out your System.gc() calls. "Is there any way to get a complete sweep like you said explicitly?" -- not that I am aware of, sorry. –  CommonsWare Nov 24 '12 at 12:14
    
thanks a lot for all the help! –  Divyansh Goenka Nov 24 '12 at 15:42

It sounds like you have a memory leak somewhere in your application if the memory is never released. This means that somewhere you are maintaining a strong reference to a large object which is being recreated (like an Activity or Bitmap) which is why calling System.gc() is making no difference.

I suggest watching the following on memory management in android from google IO 2011. It lets you know how to use the eclipse memory analyser tool which is incredibly useful for debugging this sort of error

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thank you for the response, this video has been very useful! –  Divyansh Goenka Nov 24 '12 at 15:43

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