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I know there is no such a thing. That's why I'm looking for some nice equivalent. Having this class:

class MyClass:
   a = 5
   b  = "foo"
   c = False

I would like to "group" fields a and b together to be able to somehow iterate over members only from this group. So it would be nice to have some kind of field decorator, like:

class MyClass:
   @bar
   a = 5
   @bar
   b  = "foo"
   c = False

And to have some function like myDir(MyClass, 'bar') that would return ('a', 'b').

What options do we have so far? 1. Name these fields by special convention like 'a_bar', 'b_bar' - but I can't do it unfortunately. 2. make a list of names as another class member - I would like to keep this grouping attribute close to attribute so I don't like this approach. 3. Instead of assigning 5 to 'a' and "foo" to be I can make classes that inherit from integer and string and add another base class like 'Group' and then check the types - this way I will have to generate this class each time I have new type, so I don't like this solution either.

Any other ideas?

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3  
I'd say #2 is the way to go. It's by far the simplest and least hacky way. –  delnan Nov 23 '12 at 16:30
    
So I forgot to write - I would like some ideas OUT of this list ;) –  mnowotka Nov 23 '12 at 16:32
    
Exactly what do you mean by "keep this grouping attribute close to attribute"? Are you referring perhaps to the key-value storage property of dictionaries? –  abought Nov 23 '12 at 16:32
    
I would like to have it as a property of this attribute not a property of the whole class. That way I'd be able to avoid repeating attribute's name on the list. –  mnowotka Nov 23 '12 at 16:34
    
@mnowotka Yes, I suspected that. Hence it's a comment instead of a longer rationale why #2 is the best. Still, I'm serious: I think it's by far the best you'll get. –  delnan Nov 23 '12 at 16:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Decorators are just syntactic sugar for a function call, so to apply a decorator to an attribute you just need to call it on the initialiser:

a = bar(5)

In your case you can create objects that implement the descriptor protocol:

class GroupedAttribute(object):
    def __init__(self, group, obj):
        self.group = group
        self.obj = obj
    def __get__(self, obj, owner):
        return self.obj
    def __set__(self, obj, value):
        self.obj = value

For elegance, you could write a class for attribute groups:

class GroupedAttribute(object):
    def __init__(self, group, obj):
        self.group = group
        self.obj = obj
    def __get__(self, obj, owner):
        return self.obj
    def __set__(self, obj, value):
        self.obj = value

class AttributeGroup(object):
    def __call__(self, obj):
        return GroupedAttribute(self, obj)
    def __get__(self, obj, owner):
        return BoundAttributeGroup(self, obj, owner)

class BoundAttributeGroup(object):
    def __init__(self, group, obj, owner):
        self.group = group
        self.obj = obj
        self.owner = owner
    def __dir__(self):
        items = dir(self.owner if self.obj is None else self.obj)
        return [item for item in items if
                getattr(self.owner.__dict__.get(item, None),
                        'group', None) is self.group]

Usage:

class MyClass(object):
    bar = AttributeGroup()
    a = bar(5)
    b = bar("foo")
    c = False
dir(MyClass.bar)    # ['a', 'b']
share|improve this answer
    
I suppose this could be brilliant answer but frankly I just don't understand it. Can you extend this and give an example of how to actually use your code? –  mnowotka Nov 23 '12 at 16:57
    
A descriptor is an objet that, once set on an attribute, will execute arbitrary code if you get or set this attribute. @ecatmur offer you a solution by creating a descriptor that will set and get the attribute normally, but additionally group attribute by the name you gave to it at initialisation. –  e-satis Nov 23 '12 at 17:06
    
I will mark this answer as accepted however in practice the bast answer is the one given by @delnan in comments. –  mnowotka Nov 28 '12 at 12:26

If you want to preserve variable names for referring to later, you could use a dictionary. Hence, this code inside your object...

self.dict_bar_props = {}

self.dict_bar_props["a"] = 5
self.dict_bar_props["b"] = "foo"
self.dict_bar_props["c"] = False

...would give you this result when you access the property of the object later:

objectName = myObject()
objectName.dict_bar_props["a"]
>> 5

If you want to keep the variable names totally separate but find them later based on a defined naming convention, then you can use something hacky that returns only the variable names prefixed with "bar_", such as:

import re
varnames = dir(objectName)
list_of_property_names    = [ a for a in varnames if re.match("bar_", a) ]
share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry to say that but it seems you didn't understand the question :( –  mnowotka Nov 23 '12 at 16:42
    
Insofar as the dictionary is your "group of related fields", you absolutely can iterate over the items inside, using dict_bar_props.keys() / values() or dict_bar_props.iteritems(). Can you perhaps provide an example of the expected behavior, to clarify how this would not meet your needs? –  abought Nov 23 '12 at 16:45
    
I've also added a second solution, which is a slightly lower-maintenance hybrid of options 1 and 2. –  abought Nov 23 '12 at 16:50
    
Yes. So you see it's a hybrid. And I was asking for something out from this list. Anyway, the result of this combination is still invalid. –  mnowotka Nov 23 '12 at 16:53

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