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I've been playing around with Jython recently, and I've noticed something strange. I'm sure I'm missing something obvious here, but can someone explain to me why .reverse() doesn't work on a single row of a multidimensional array?

input is being passed in from Java using PythonInterpreter.set()

When I execute the following python code...

#Integer[][] input
print(input[0])
input[0].reverse()
print(input[0])

I get the following output, with the values not having been reversed.

array(java.lang.Integer, [0, 1, 1, 1, 1])
array(java.lang.Integer, [0, 1, 1, 1, 1])

Though if I execute reverse() on a single dimensional array...

#Integer[] input;
print(input)
input.reverse()
print(input)

The results are as I would expect.

array(java.lang.Integer, [0, 1, 1, 1, 1])
array(java.lang.Integer, [1, 1, 1, 1, 0])

Likewise, if I copy input[0] to its own variable, then reverse, it also works as expected.

#Integer[][] input
print(input[0])
tmp = input[0]
tmp.reverse()
input[0] = tmp
print(input[0])

I also get the results I would expect.

array(java.lang.Integer, [0, 1, 1, 1, 1])
array(java.lang.Integer, [1, 1, 1, 1, 0])

I also get the expected result from...

#Integer[][] input
print(input[0])
input[0] = input[::-1]
print(input[0])

---EDIT---

It would also appear that .insert() also fails to act in under these circumstances...

#Integer[][] input
print(input[0])
input[0].insert(0,123)
print(input[0])

Produces...

array(java.lang.Integer, [0, 1, 1, 1, 1])
array(java.lang.Integer, [0, 1, 1, 1, 1])

Same goes for .append() and .pop(). I have the feeling this applies to many, if not all, list functions.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is possible that accessing input[0] (as well as any other index) creates a single-dimensional array with a copy of the data, not a view of the data, as you are expecting.

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It would seem you're correct. pop()ing index[0] returns the correct result, but does not modify the original Integer[][], which is consistent with your suggestion. Thanks. –  Mike Nov 23 '12 at 20:26

My guess is that when you use Integer[][] input, you create a table (mutable) of immutable datas. Therefore, while you can modify the list, you can't modify the object contained in that list. Therefore all method that would require to modify your array (append, pop, reverse), will not work.

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but wouldn't it raise an exception in that case, like you are trying to alter an immutable instead of essentially failing silently. –  Marwan Alsabbagh Nov 23 '12 at 18:07

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