Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
class Link{       
   char name[];
   Link *next;
};

Link::Link(char pname[]){       
   next=NULL;
   name[]=pname;    
};

How can I assign value I am passing (pname) when creating object to name[] in the class Link?

share|improve this question
11  
Use std::string and your life will be a lot easier. –  chris Nov 23 '12 at 16:55
    
Do you wish to copy the reference to the underlying chars, or the chars themselves? You can remove a lot of stress and ambiguity here by using std::string, std::array<char, n> or std::vector<char> depending on what you intended to do. –  Rook Nov 23 '12 at 16:58

3 Answers 3

Usually, you would use std::string to store strings:

class Link{       
   std::string name;
   Link *next;
};

Link::Link(char const pname[]) : next(NULL), name(pname) {}       

If you have a very good reason for embedding an array of characters rather than letting the standard string class take care of memory allocation for you, then you would need something like:

class Link{       
   char name[I_HOPE_THIS_IS_BIG_ENOUGH];
   Link *next;
};

Link::Link(char const pname[]) : next(NULL) {
    name[sizeof name - 1] = 0;
    std::strncpy(name, pname, sizeof name);
    if (name[sizeof name - 1] != 0) {
        throw std::runtime_error("Whoops! My buffer was too small.");
    }
}       
share|improve this answer

Firstly, you cannot have a char name[] as a member of a class. The type has to be complete, i.e. a strict fixed array size has to be specified explicitly

class Link {       
   char name[100];
   Link *next;
};

Secondly, raw arrays cannot be assigned or copy-initialized. To copy data from one generic array to the other you can use a library function

Link::Link(const char pname[]) : next(NULL) {       
   std::copy(pname, pname + 100, name);
   // Assuming `pname` also points to an array of 100 chars
}

or, if we are dealing with a zero-terminated character array (aka C-string)

Link::Link(const char pname[]) : next(NULL) {       
   assert(std::strlen(pname) < 100);
   std::strcpy(name, pname);
}

Thirdly, and most importantly, in many cases the proper solution will depend on the nature of your array. What is name in your case? You provided no information in your question. Is it a string or not? If it is supposed to be a string, you might be much better off using std::string class instead of the raw char array. Even if you need an array (not a string), you might be better off using std::vector.

share|improve this answer

I suggest this solution:

class Link {
Link(char* pname )  {
     name=pname;
}
char* name;
Link *next;
};
share|improve this answer
    
And what happens when the data pointed to is destroyed ({char name[] = "abc"; Link l(name);})? –  chris Nov 23 '12 at 17:09
    
You'll need to document the requirement that the string must outlive the Link object; and hope that the users obey that requirement, since there's no way to enforce it. –  Mike Seymour Nov 23 '12 at 17:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.