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std::map::const_iterator template compilation error

The idea is to create a function which takes the container type as a Template parameter. Since maps have to summed up differently compared to other sequential containers I overloaded the Sum function for the map as shown below.

This is the function which is giving me errors:

template<typename T1, typename T2>
double Sum(const map<T1,T2>& input)
{
double finalSum=0;
map<T1,T2>::const_iterator iter_begin=input.begin();
map<T1,T2>::const_iterator iter_end=input.end();

for(iter_begin; iter_begin!=iter_end; ++iter_begin)
{
    finalSum=finalSum+(iter_begin)->second;
}
return finalSum;
}

Error:

1>c:\documents and settings\keep\my documents\visual studio 2010\projects\level 7\exercise 2\exercise 2\sum.h(34): error C4430: missing type specifier - int assumed. Note: C++ does not support default-int

1>c:\documents and settings\keep\my documents\visual studio 2010\projects\level 7\exercise 2\exercise 2\sum.h(34): error C2143: syntax error : missing ',' before '<'

This function is a part of the header file. My header file includes the function definitions also.

Few things: 1. I tried with typename but I might have been wrong. Templates are not my strong area yet. Feel free to point if typename is needed somewhere. Inline keyword will help?

  1. The same code is compiling fine on my Guide's machine. Mine is VC++ 2010 Express SP1. I do not know what his version of VC++ is.

Thanks in advance.

EDIT: Posting the whole Header file.With typename addition as suggested. But same error. The first version of Sum is compiling fine without typename. The second one overloaded for map is giving issues.

#ifndef SUM_H
#define SUM_H

template<typename T>    
double Sum(const T& input)                                                  
{
double finalSum=0;
T::const_iterator iter_begin=input.begin();
T::const_iterator iter_end=input.end();

for(iter_begin; iter_begin!=iter_end; ++iter_begin)
{
    finalSum=finalSum+(*iter_begin);
}
return finalSum;
}


//Mysterion !!!!!
template<typename T1, typename T2>
double Sum(const map<T1,T2>& input)
{
double finalSum=0;
typename map<T1,T2>::const_iterator iter_begin=input.begin();
typename map<T1,T2>::const_iterator iter_end=input.end();

for(iter_begin; iter_begin!=iter_end; ++iter_begin)
{
    finalSum=finalSum+(iter_begin)->second;
}
return finalSum;
}   

#endif

The error is coming at: double Sum(const map& input)

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marked as duplicate by Bo Persson, Luksprog, ecatmur, WhozCraig, evilone Nov 24 '12 at 15:37

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Note: When posting an error message about a particular piece of code, it's helpful to indicate (in the code) where the errors occur as we do not have the benefit of the line numbers to help us figure it out. –  Matthieu M. Nov 23 '12 at 18:09
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4 Answers

This is where you need the typenames:

typename map<T1,T2>::const_iterator iter_begin=input.begin();
typename map<T1,T2>::const_iterator iter_end=input.end();
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You've guessed it - you need typename. Roughly, the rule is that if you're referring to a type using :: and the thing on the left of :: depends on template arguments, you must use typename. So in your case:

typename map<T1,T2>::const_iterator iter_begin=input.begin();
typename map<T1,T2>::const_iterator iter_end=input.end();
share|improve this answer
    
If the thing on the right of the :: is a type, that is. –  juanchopanza Nov 23 '12 at 17:42
    
@pubby,@nawaz,@Angew typename map<T1,T2>::const_iterator iter_begin=input.begin(); typename map<T1,T2>::const_iterator iter_end=input.end(); Did not help. Same error. –  NotAgain Nov 23 '12 at 17:51
    
@CPlusPlus-Killing-me-softly Then it's probably missing qualification. Try changing map to std::map (everywhere map is used). And also #include <map>. –  Angew Nov 23 '12 at 18:05
    
Yes. You are right. This is header file and I forgot to include the map header. std::map<T1,T2>::const_iterator iter_begin=input.begin(); std::map<T1,T2>::const_iterator iter_end=input.end(); Worked. typename absence did not make a difference. Have to read more on that. Many thanks. –  NotAgain Nov 23 '12 at 18:12
    
@CPlusPlus-Killing-me-softly The standard requires typename to be there. However, Visual Studio is very forgiving in this and usually guesses missing typenames correctly (at the cost of longer compilation). This is rather bad for multi-platform projects. –  Angew Nov 23 '12 at 18:20
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You forgot to #include <map> and you should also qualify its name with the std qualifier since that is where map lives.

Don't worry too much about the typename (though it would be good to add them) because VC++ is lenient (and non-conformant) so it's not the primary error.

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Ashamed of my silly error. Will move over to g++ for my test programs. VC++ will spoil me. –  NotAgain Nov 23 '12 at 18:24
    
Try out clang if you can, it's stricter than gcc. –  Matthieu M. Nov 23 '12 at 19:06
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You should use typename because const_iterator is a dependent-name (seach for this term, you will find lots of explanation):

typename map<T1,T2>::const_iterator iter_begin=input.begin();
typename map<T1,T2>::const_iterator iter_end=input.end();

Well that looks ugly.

In C++11, auto makes your life easy:

auto iter_begin=input.cbegin(); //use cbegin, instead of begin
auto iter_end=input.cend();     //use cend, instead of end

Or range-based for loop:

for(auto item : input)
{ 
   finalSum = finalSum + item.second;
}  
share|improve this answer
    
auto iter_begin=input.cbegin(); //use cbegin, instead of begin auto iter_end=input.cend(); //use cend, instead of end Is also giving me same error. Is my compiler outdated? VC++ 2010 SP1. –  NotAgain Nov 23 '12 at 18:03
1  
@CPlusPlus-Killing-me-softly: VC++ is lagging behind in terms of features supported, but it's Standard Library implementation (esp regarding concurrency support) is top notch... Try and get the latest update (they released a "preview" with lambda support I think). –  Matthieu M. Nov 23 '12 at 19:07
    
VC++ doesn't support the ranged for and... top notch? Eh... take a look at their implementation of vector::emplace_back. –  Ed S. Nov 23 '12 at 19:31
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