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I have a 2D numpy array as follows:

import numpy as np
foo = np.array([[(i+1)*(j+1) for i in range(10)] for j in range(5)])

    #array([[ 1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9, 10],
    #       [ 2,  4,  6,  8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20],
    #       [ 3,  6,  9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27, 30],
    #       [ 4,  8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, 32, 36, 40],
    #       [ 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50]])

I create some filter criteria using np.nonzero:

csum = np.sum(foo,axis=0)
#array([ 15,  30,  45,  60,  75,  90, 105, 120, 135, 150])
rsum = np.sum(foo,axis=1)
#array([ 55, 110, 165, 220, 275])
cfilter = np.nonzero(csum > 80)
#(array([5, 6, 7, 8, 9]),)
rfilter = np.nonzero(rsum < 165)
#(array([0, 1]),)

Now is there some elegant numpy slicing method to get all combinations of foo[r,c] for r in rfilter and c in cfilter? i.e. I want to get the following output:

array([[ 6,  7,  8,  9, 10],
       [12, 14, 16, 18, 20]])

Note: I know that it is easy to do basic slice selection to get a block from the array but in a more advanced use case the indices in cfilter and rfilter aren't necessarily right next to each other.

Thanks very much!

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yet another way is to use indexing twice:

In [167]: foo[rsum<165][:,csum>80]
Out[167]: 
array([[ 6,  7,  8,  9, 10],
       [12, 14, 16, 18, 20]])

It is readable, and fairly fast:

In [168]: %timeit foo[rsum<165][:,csum>80]
100000 loops, best of 3: 9.66 us per loop

In [170]: %timeit foo[np.ix_(rsum<165, csum>80)]
100000 loops, best of 3: 16.4 us per loop

PS: A faster way to create foo is

In [31]: np.multiply.outer(range(1,6),range(1,11))
Out[31]: 
array([[ 1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9, 10],
       [ 2,  4,  6,  8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20],
       [ 3,  6,  9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27, 30],
       [ 4,  8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, 32, 36, 40],
       [ 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50]])

In [32]: %timeit np.multiply.outer(range(1,6),range(1,11))
100000 loops, best of 3: 14.2 us per loop

In [33]: %timeit np.array([[(i+1)*(j+1) for i in range(10)] for j in range(5)])
10000 loops, best of 3: 26.6 us per loop
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answer chosen because it has a faster speed! thanks –  ejang Nov 23 '12 at 23:35
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To index the cross product, use np.ix_:

foo[np.ix_(*(rfilter + cfilter))]

You can use boolean indexing directly (i.e. not using np.nonzero):

foo[np.ix_(np.sum(foo, axis=1) < 165, np.sum(foo, axis=0) > 80)]

Note that all np.ix_ does is add axes appropriately to give index arrays that can be broadcast together:

>>> np.ix_(*(rfilter + cfilter))
(array([[0],
       [1]]), array([[5, 6, 7, 8, 9]]))
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You don't actually need nonzero for this. Expressions like (csum > 80) result in a new matrix. What you want is (csum > 80) && (rsum < 165), but && is not defined on matrices. However, * is and it does the same on boolean matrices. The only problem you have is that your csum and rsum arrays aren't the right shape. But they can be broadcast if you stack them correctly.

csum = np.hstack (sum (foo, axis=0))
rsum = np.vstack (sum (foo, axis=1))
print foo[(csum > 80) * (hsum < 165)]

The only drawback is that this produces the values of the cells you asked for in a one-dimensional array. You will need to reshape() it to get the format you asked for.

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