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I had to discover I have Java code in my project, which compiles and runs fine in Eclipse, but throws a compilation error in javac.

A self-contained snippet:

import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Set;

public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
    Set<Integer> setOfInts = new HashSet<Integer>();
    Set<Object> setOfObjects = covariantSet(setOfInts);
    }

    public static <S, T extends S> Set<S> covariantSet(Set<T> set) {
    return new HashSet<S>(set);
    }

}

Compilation in javac returns:

Main.java:10: incompatible types
found   : java.util.Set<java.lang.Integer>
required: java.util.Set<java.lang.Object>
    Set<Object> setOfObjects = covariantSet(setOfInts);
                                           ^

This error now prevents building the project in Maven. As the Eclipse compiler is built to be more tolerant, I now have to assume the definition and usage of snippets as above static method is no valid Java?

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Could it be that they are using different versions of the JDK (say Java 6 vs Java 7 for example) and this would be a bug in older JDK versions? –  assylias Nov 23 '12 at 18:03
    
I use javac 1.6.0_37, and Eclipse Helios with compiler compliance level 1.6. –  mtsz Nov 23 '12 at 18:07
    
FYI I just tested your code and it compiles with Java 7 but not with Java 6. –  assylias Nov 23 '12 at 18:09
    
@assylias Thanks, this is a helpful information. Wonder why that is exactly... –  mtsz Nov 23 '12 at 18:26
    
Are you aware that the T is unnecessary for covariantSet as it is here? (covariantSet(<Set<? extends S> set) is equivalent -- unless of course your actual method is more complex and uses T somehow, although I at the moment can think of no good example where the difference of S and T would be relevant.) –  arne.b Nov 24 '12 at 0:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

It seems that Sun's 1.6 JDK can't infer the correct type. The following seems to work on my machine:

Set<Object> setOfObjects = Main.<Object, Integer>covariantSet(setOfInts);

Note that you must invoke the static method prefixed with the class name

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Works here as well. Nice solution, thanks. –  mtsz Nov 23 '12 at 18:30
    
Accepting this answer, since it provides the least intrusive workaround to solve the stated problem. –  mtsz Nov 24 '12 at 19:08

You are right. This problem indeed exists. Eclipse does not use javac. It uses its own compiler.

Actually javac is "right". Generics are erasures. Type S is not included into your byte code, so jvm does not have enough information about the return type at runtime. To solve the problem change the method prototype as following:

public static <S, T extends S> Set<S> covariantSet(Set<T> set, Class<S> returnType)

Now the return type is passed to the method at runtime and compiler should not complain.

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1  
It seems to compile ok with javac / JDK 7 –  assylias Nov 23 '12 at 18:11
    
Your solution works as described. I was suspecting type erasure to be cause. Interestingly though, as assylias mentioned above, it seems to compile in java 7. –  mtsz Nov 23 '12 at 18:25
    
@mtsz that would mean that java 7 improved on the generic inference –  ratchet freak Nov 23 '12 at 22:28
    
I think it is a bug in JDK 6. as AlexR mentioned generics are erasures. But that also means that the Set does not need the information of beeing of type <S> at runtime. Hence the quasi equivalent after comilation is simply Set setOfObjects = Main.covariantSet(setOfInts); No need of generics at all. And for compile time the generic types should be injected correctly just like the eclipse compiler does. –  cornz Jan 22 at 13:50

In your Maven build skript you have set the compiler version.

In Ant it lookes like this:

<property name="source.version" value="1.5" />

search for 1.3 or 1.4, or compile to find that value in the maven skripts

With value 1.5 the compiler will accept the generics (see your error messages)

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2  
It appears to be recognizing generics just fine, though. –  Dave Newton Nov 23 '12 at 18:07
    
Unfortunately, setting the java source and target-version of maven-compiler-plugin to 1.5 does not help. –  mtsz Nov 23 '12 at 18:16
    
Did you tried the Abnswer of AlexR ? –  AlexWien Nov 23 '12 at 18:17

I know it's old question, but I want to mention, the function could be written as:

import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Set;

public class Main {

public static void main(String[] args) {
        Set<Integer> setOfInts = new HashSet<Integer>();
        Set<Object> setOfObjects = covariantSet(setOfInts);
    }

    public static <S> Set<S> covariantSet(Set<? extends S> set) {
        return new HashSet<S>(set);
    }

}

It's a little bit cleaner and you can use the function exactly how you intented to(with implicit generic typing).

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Add the next plugin to your pom.xml:

<plugin>
     <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
     <version>2.3.2</version>
     <configuration>
          <source>1.6</source>
          <target>1.6</target>
     </configuration>
</plugin>
share|improve this answer
1  
I've tried your snippet which denotes an older version of the maven-compiler-plugin. It does not help. I am using the most current version 2.5.1 –  mtsz Nov 23 '12 at 18:18

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