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Say we have a class with several protected and/or public methods. I need to perform a check each time a method is called. I could do that check each time i call a method :

class Object
{
    // Methods
}

$o = new Object();

if($mayAccess) $o->someMethod();

or

if($mayAccess) $this->someMethod();

But i would like developers neither to have to think about it nor to write it. I've thought about using __call to do :

class Object
{
    public function __call($methodName, $args)
    {
        if($mayAccess) call_user_func_array($this->$methodName, $args);
    }
}

Unfortunatly, if i call the method from inside the class, __call will not invoked as it only works when a non-visible method is called.

Is there a clean way to hide this check for both internal and external calls ? Again the goal is to make sure a developper won't forget to do it when calling a method.

Thanks in advance :)

EDIT :

I have another way of doing this :

class Object
{
    public function __call($methodName, $args)
    {
        if($mayAccess) call_user_func_array($methodName, $args);
    }
}

function someMethod() { }

But i won't be able to use $this anymore, which means no protected methods, which i do need.

share|improve this question
    
Please have a look to the call_user_func_array manual page. I corrected 3 times the same mistake in this single post : if you want a method to be callable, you must use array($object, $method) to describe it. –  Alain Tiemblo Nov 23 '12 at 18:54
    
Okay thank you. –  Virus721 Nov 23 '12 at 18:54
1  
@Ninsuo Don't do that. You absolutely should not be correcting the code in a question. The code as posted by the person asking the question needs to remain as it was written. –  meagar Nov 23 '12 at 18:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

No, I dont think so. What you could do though is write a proxy:

class MayAccessProxy {

    private $_obj;

    public function __construct($obj) {
        $this->_obj = $obj;
    }

    public function __call($methodName, $args) {
        if($mayAccess) call_user_func_array(array($this->_obj, $methodName), $args);
    }
}

This means you have to instantiate a proxy for every object you want to check:

$obj = new MayAccessProxy(new Object());
$obj->someMethod();

Ofcourse you'd also want the proxy to behave exactly like the object itself. So you also have to define the other magic methods.

To make it a bit easier for the developers you could do something like this:

class Object {

    /**
     * Not directly instanciable.
     */
    private __construct() {}  

    /**
     * @return self
     */
    public static function createInstance() {
        $obj = new MayAccessProxy(new self());
        return $obj;
    }
}

$obj = Object::createInstance();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your help. This still involes the developpers to think about the proxy and write it, so i should maybe think about another way to do this. –  Virus721 Nov 23 '12 at 18:49
    
Problem is, you don't have to instantiate these proxy objects -- you can still just use that new Object() directly. So this still puts it on the developers to remember to always create/use a proxy. Not exactly onerous, but still a bit error-prone... –  cHao Nov 23 '12 at 18:49
    
Ok thanks again for your help. –  Virus721 Nov 23 '12 at 18:56
    
If you're going to include a named constructor, you probably want to ensure that the real constructor is not public. That'd go a long way toward preventing naked Objects from floating around. –  cHao Nov 23 '12 at 18:57
    
This is not the Singleton pattern. Just so you know. :) It's just a named constructor. –  cHao Nov 23 '12 at 18:58

You call same function tat does not exist all both from outside and inside. This way you can only get infinite loop.

class Object
{
    public function __call($methodName, $args)
    {
        $methodName = '_' . $methodName;
        if($mayAccess) call_user_func_array($this->$methodName, $args);
    }

    private function _methodName()
    {
     // code
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Main drawback here is, most doc tools and IDEs will no longer pick up methodName as a callable method. You'd have to add magic-method documentation for all the methods whose calls you reroute this way. –  cHao Nov 23 '12 at 18:41

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