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I have this function that creates a Ball object and appends it to a list:

list_of_balls = []

def create_new_ball():
    newball = Ball()
    list_of_balls.append(newball)

I need to be able to remove specific instances of Ball from that list. I have no idea how to do this. I cant use list_of_balls.index() because all the instances are attached to the private variable newball. When I get the list something like this is returned:

[<main.Foo instance at 0x22149c>, <main.Foo instance at 0x22111c>, <main.Foo instance at 0x2209b4>, <main.Foo instance at 0x22129c>]

So I have no idea of how to aim specific instances.

Is there a way to remove specific instances of Ball from that list? Each Ball instance needs to be able to remove itself from the list, but how do the instance knows who it is on the list and/or what is its index?

Edit: What I need to do is to identify them on that list (or dictionary, or other alternative). I know how to remove items from a list, what I can't figure out is how to do it specifically.

I want to do exactly what aList.remove() does, but I don't have a variable to use as argument, so I need an alternative.

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On what basis do you want to remove your instance? –  Rohit Jain Nov 23 '12 at 19:41
    
How do you know which Ball to remove? Do you have another reference to the instance? –  mgilson Nov 23 '12 at 19:43
2  
The question is, how do you know which instance you want to remove? Whatever information you, the human, are using to decide which one to remove, you need to somehow get that information into your program, by attaching it to your object (i.e., giving each Ball an attribute that distinguishes it from the others). –  BrenBarn Nov 23 '12 at 19:44
    
A Ball object doesn't even know it's in a list and in fact could be in several of them as well as in other container object. To do this, two pieces of information are needed: the container and the identity of the Ball instance to be removed. You might be able to use the id() of the Ball instance you want to remove to locate it in a particular container. For lists you could use its index, for a dictionary the key associated with it would do. –  martineau Nov 23 '12 at 19:59
    
@Rohit Jain - I need to find a specific object on that list and remove it. On this case each time a ball bounces X times needs to be removed. The list is big (up to len 1000), and balls will be removed and added constantly. –  JCPedroza Nov 23 '12 at 20:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

list.remove seems to work Ok:

>>> class Ball(object): pass
... 
>>> balls = [ Ball() for _ in range(10) ]
>>> balls
[<__main__.Ball object at 0xe5350>, <__main__.Ball object at 0xe52b0>, <__main__.Ball object at 0xe5250>, <__main__.Ball object at 0xe5370>, <__main__.Ball object at 0xe5390>, <__main__.Ball object at 0xe53b0>, <__main__.Ball object at 0xe53d0>, <__main__.Ball object at 0xe5410>, <__main__.Ball object at 0xe5430>, <__main__.Ball object at 0xe5450>]
>>> balls.remove(balls[4])
>>> balls
[<__main__.Ball object at 0xe5350>, <__main__.Ball object at 0xe52b0>, <__main__.Ball object at 0xe5250>, <__main__.Ball object at 0xe5370>, <__main__.Ball object at 0xe53b0>, <__main__.Ball object at 0xe53d0>, <__main__.Ball object at 0xe5410>, <__main__.Ball object at 0xe5430>, <__main__.Ball object at 0xe5450>]
>>> len(balls)
9

The real question is how do you know which Ball you want to remove?

Based on the comments, it looks like you want all of the balls which have bounced N times to be removed:

to_remove = [x for x in balls if x.times_bounced > N]
for x in to_remove:
    balls.remove(x)

Alternatively, if you don't need to do this in place, you can create a new list with balls which haven't bounced N times:

balls = [ x for x in balls if x.times_bounced <= N ]

Finally, you can use this idiom and slice assignment to do the whole thing in place if you need to:

balls[:] = [ x for x in balls if x.times_bounced <= N ]
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"The real question is how do you know which Ball you want to remove?" Exactly! I know how to remove items from a list, but I can't find a way to remove specific objects from that list on this scenario. I don't know how to identify them separately. –  JCPedroza Nov 23 '12 at 19:58
    
@notsuresure -- yes. Do you know the instance you want to remove? Are you removing based on some attribute? How are you picking which you need to remove from the list? –  mgilson Nov 23 '12 at 19:59
    
I need to remove from the list the ball that has bounced X times. How do you remove items from lists based on attributes? Is it posible to remove them based on a property? I do know the instance I want to remove, but I don't know its index on the list, or how to find it on the list. –  JCPedroza Nov 23 '12 at 20:05
    
@notsuresure -- See my edit. –  mgilson Nov 23 '12 at 20:09
    
Another alternative that worked was: list_of_balls.remove(self), this can be implemented as a method in the class. –  JCPedroza Nov 23 '12 at 21:20

So I have no idea of how to aim specific instances.

You need to have some idea of how to identify the instances; and in that case, you can simply carry over that into an actual working way. For example give them a name, or an id. You could then use a dictionary or something else. By default the instances are only identifiable by their exact identity.

Each Ball instance needs to be able to remove itself from the list

>>> class Ball ():
        pass
>>> list_of_balls = []
>>> def create_new_ball():
        list_of_balls.append(Ball())
>>> def remove_yourself(ball):
        list_of_balls.remove(ball)
>>> for i in range(10): create_new_ball()
>>> list_of_balls
[<__main__.Ball object at 0x0000000002EB5E48>, <__main__.Ball object at 0x0000000002EBD908>, <__main__.Ball object at 0x0000000002EBDEB8>, <__main__.Ball object at 0x0000000002EBDE80>, <__main__.Ball object at 0x0000000002EBD978>, <__main__.Ball object at 0x0000000002ED41D0>, <__main__.Ball object at 0x0000000002ED4208>, <__main__.Ball object at 0x0000000002ED4240>, <__main__.Ball object at 0x0000000002ED4278>, <__main__.Ball object at 0x0000000002ED42B0>]
>>> one_ball = list_of_balls[4] # random ball, chosen by fair dice roll
>>> one_ball in list_of_balls
True
>>> remove_yourself(one_ball)
>>> one_ball in list_of_balls
False
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How do I give them a name on this implementation? The function gives all the instances the same name doesn't it? How do I give them and ID and how can I use that ID to find an instance on a list? –  JCPedroza Nov 23 '12 at 20:07
    
The function does not give them a name, no, they just use their object identity. If you have some kind of ID, you could just create a dictionary: balls = {'firstBall': Ball(), 'secondBall': Ball()}. Then you can just access a ball using balls['firstBall']. –  poke Nov 23 '12 at 20:42

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