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Device GeForce GTX 680 In my program,value is copied from host to device variable using CUDA Memcpy. I could see that previous values are retained in global memory on different executions of program.(Running the executable multiple times) Code test.cu:

First run:

const test[]="overflowhappen";
cudaMalloc((void **) &test_d, sizeof(char)*strlen(test));

cudaMemcpy(test_d,test,sizeof(char)*strlen(test),cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
function<<<1,1>>>(testfn);


nvcc test.cu
cuda-gdb a.out

<gdb> b testfn
<gdb>p test_d  ->>overflowhappen

Second run(I changed test string to var)

const test[]="var"
cudaMalloc((void **) &test_d, sizeof(char)*strlen(test));
cudaMemcpy(test_d,test,sizeof(char)*strlen(test),cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
function<<<1,1>>>(testfn);

nvcc test.cu
cuda-gdb a.out

<gdb> b testfn
<gdb>p test_d  ->> varrflowhappen

"rflowhappen" is copied from previous run.I tried cudaMemset to the variable but, still it shows values from previous runs as the variable value. Is it a problem with code? .How can I prevent it?

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3  
since your second run only wrote the first 3 characters, the previous contents of the memory that you did not overwrite remained the same. If you use a null terminated string, it probably shouldn't matter. If you use cudaMemset, you will need to allocate a large enough string space to overwrite whatever values you want to overwrite. GPU memory is not and should not be presumed to be cleared or set to zero, unless you explicitly do this. –  Robert Crovella Nov 23 '12 at 21:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think the bug may be trivial: you didn't copy the end-string character 0. When copying C strings, you should always take strlen+1. As a result, in your second run, you allocate memory and copy {'v','a','r'}, instead of {'v','a','r','\0'}.

When you then try to print it, you get var##### where #### is whatever garbage was there in memory. My guess is that in the first run, that garbage was 0 so the string ended seemingly correct, while in the second run it was the garbage left by the first program.

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