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I'd like to tell the difference between valid and invalid date objects in JS, but couldn't figure out how:

var d = new Date("foo");
console.log(d.toString()); // shows 'Invalid Date'
console.log(typeof d); // shows 'object'
console.log(d instanceof Date); // shows 'true'

Any ideas for writing an isValidDate function?

EDIT - thanks for the responses!

  • Ash recommended Date.parse for parsing date strings, which gives an authoritative way to check if the date string is valid.
  • What I would prefer, if possible, is have my API accept a Date instance and to be able to check/assert whether it's valid or not. Borgar's solution does that, but I need to test it across browsers. I also wonder whether there's a more elegant way.

EDIT 2

  • Ash made me consider not having my API accept Date instances at all, this would be easiest to validate.
  • Borgar suggested testing for a Date instance, and then testing for the Date's time value. If the date is invalid, the time value is NaN. I checked with ECMA-262 (section 15.9.5.9) and this behavior is in the standard, which is exactly what I'm looking for.

My final function, based on Borgar's solution:

function isValidDate(d) {
  if ( Object.prototype.toString.call(d) !== "[object Date]" )
    return false;
  return !isNaN(d.getTime());
}
share|improve this question
    
I deleted my original answer since checking if NaN is a much better solution than comparing to a string "Invalid Date". I'll have to make use of the isNaN solution, myself. –  Chris Charabaruk Aug 30 '09 at 11:55
    
@orip, "have my API accept a Date instance and to be able to check/assert whether it's valid or not" Have you tried: isNan(d.getTime())==true on the date instance? –  Ash Aug 30 '09 at 17:49
7  
You could remove the if statement by changing the body of the function to: return ( Object.prototype.toString.call(d) === "[object Date]" && !isNaN(d.getTime()) ); –  styfle Jun 23 '11 at 23:35
1  
@styfle - sure, but why? –  orip Jun 25 '11 at 14:39
1  
@styfle - guess it's a style preference: I find it clearer to separate the type check from the equality logic. –  orip Jun 27 '11 at 13:05

24 Answers 24

up vote 258 down vote accepted

Here's how I would do it:

if ( Object.prototype.toString.call(d) === "[object Date]" ) {
  // it is a date
  if ( isNaN( d.getTime() ) ) {  // d.valueOf() could also work
    // date is not valid
  }
  else {
    // date is valid
  }
}
else {
  // not a date
}
share|improve this answer
7  
Why not "d instanceof Date" for that first comparison instead? –  Chris Charabaruk Aug 30 '09 at 11:54
9  
Chris: "d instance Date" is true for an invalid date as well –  orip Aug 30 '09 at 11:59
10  
instanceof breaks across frames. Duck-typing can work just fine too: validDate == d && d.getTime && !isNaN(d.getTime()); -- Since the question is for a general utility function I prefer to be more strict. –  Borgar Aug 30 '09 at 12:14
7  
@Borgar, just found my answer: "The problems arise when it comes to scripting in multi-frame DOM environments. In a nutshell, Array objects created within one iframe do not share [[Prototype]]’s with arrays created within another iframe. Their constructors are different objects and so both instanceof and constructor checks fail." –  Ash Aug 31 '09 at 5:35
3  
you don't even need d.getTime just isNan(d) –  TecHunter May 30 '13 at 8:26

Instead of using "new Date()" you should use:

var timestamp=Date.parse('foo')

if (isNaN(timestamp)==false)
{
    var d=new Date(timestamp);

}

Date.parse() returns a timestamp, an integer representing the number of milliseconds since 01/Jan/1970. It will return NaN if it cannot parse the supplied date string.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1, very nice, thanks! Date.parse returns milliseconds, not a Date object, so after the test we still need to construct a Date object from it (new Date(d)) –  orip Aug 30 '09 at 13:24
1  
Glad to help, I've edited the answer to make it clearer that Date.parse returns a timestamp in millisecond. –  Ash Aug 30 '09 at 13:31
23  
-1 Dunno why this has so many up votes, Date.parse is implementation dependent and definitely not to be trusted to parse general date strings. There is no single format that is parsed correctly in popular browsers, much less all those in use (though eventually the ISO8601 format specified in ES5 should be ok). –  RobG May 25 '12 at 2:30
6  
this might work but will still return false positives for "02/31/2012" which is not valid –  John Aug 31 '12 at 7:25
1  
The behavior of Date.parse is not standard across the browsers –  Genady Sergeev Oct 22 '12 at 11:45

You can check the validity of a Date object d via

d instanceof Date && isFinite(d)

To avoid cross-frame issues, one could replace the instanceof check with

Object.prototype.toString.call(d) === '[object Date]'

A call to getTime() as in Borgar's answer is unnecessary as isNaN() and isFinite() both implicitly convert to number.

share|improve this answer
    
Try this in chrome - Object.prototype.toString.call(new Date("2013-07-09T19:07:9Z")). It will return "[object Date]". According to you, therefore, "2013-07-09T19:07:9Z", should be a valid date. But it is not. You can verify it, again in chrome, by doing var dateStr = new Date("2013-07-09T19:07:9Z"); dateStr It will return invalid date. –  Tintin Jul 18 '13 at 0:06
    
@Tintin: that's what isFinite() is for - toString.call() is only a replacement for the instanceof part of the check –  Christoph Jul 18 '13 at 5:25

My solution is for simply checking whether you get a valid date object:

Implementation

Date.prototype.isValid = function () {
    // An invalid date object returns NaN for getTime() and NaN is the only
    // object not strictly equal to itself.
    return this.getTime() === this.getTime();
};  

Usage

var d = new Date("lol");

console.log(d.isValid()); // false

d = new Date("2012/09/11");

console.log(d.isValid()); // true
share|improve this answer
3  
isNaN is a more explicit way to test for NaN –  orip Sep 11 '12 at 17:16
1  
And yet, you always find people writing their own versions :) documentcloud.github.com/underscore/docs/… –  Ash Clarke Sep 12 '12 at 9:00
1  
since I respect underscore.js this prompted some research. isNaN("a") === true, while ("a" !== "a") === false. It's worth thinking about. +1 –  orip Sep 12 '12 at 9:14
    
Thanks @orip. I did not remember that they did it for that reason! –  Ash Clarke Sep 12 '12 at 10:39
    
Downvote, seriously? –  Ash Clarke Apr 15 at 14:15

Would like to mention that the JQuery DatePicker UI widget has a very good date validator utility method that checks for format and validity (e.g., no 01/33/2013 dates allowed).

Even if you don't want to use the datepicker widget on your page as a UI element, you can always add its .js library to your page and then call the validator method, passing the value you want to validate into it. To make life even easier, it takes a string as input, not a Javascript Date object.

See: http://api.jqueryui.com/datepicker/

It's not listed as a method, but it is there-- as a utility function. Search the page for "parsedate" and you'll find:

$.datepicker.parseDate( format, value, settings ) - Extract a date from a string value with a specified format.

Example usage:

var stringval = '01/03/2012';
var testdate;

try {
  testdate = $.datepicker.parseDate('mm/dd/yy', stringval);
             // Notice 'yy' indicates a 4-digit year value
} catch (e)
{
 alert(stringval + ' is not valid.  Format must be MM/DD/YYYY ' +
       'and the date value must be valid for the calendar.';
}

(More info re specifying date formats is found at http://docs.jquery.com/UI/Datepicker/parseDate )

In the above example, you wouldn't see the alert message since '01/03/2012' is a calendar-valid date in the specified format. However if you made 'stringval' equal to '13/04/2013', for example, you would get the alert message, since the value '13/04/2013' is not calendar-valid.

If a passed-in string value is successfully parsed, the value of 'testdate' would be a Javascript Date object representing the passed-in string value. If not, it'd be undefined.

share|improve this answer

I really liked Christoph's approach (but didn't have enough of a reputation to vote it up). For my use, I know I will always have a Date object so I just extended date with a valid() method.

Date.prototype.valid = function() {
  return isFinite(this);
}

Now I can just write this and it's much more descriptive than just checking isFinite in code...

d = new Date(userDate);
if (d.valid()) { /* do stuff */ }
share|improve this answer

Nice solution! Included in my library of auxiliary functions, now it looks like this:

Object.isDate = function(obj) {
/// <summary>
/// Determines if the passed object is an instance of Date.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="obj">The object to test.</param>

    return Object.prototype.toString.call(obj) === '[object Date]';
}

Object.isValidDate = function(obj) {
/// <summary>
/// Determines if the passed object is a Date object, containing an actual date.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="obj">The object to test.</param>

    return Object.isDate(obj) && !isNaN(obj.getTime());
}
share|improve this answer

I use the following code to validate values for year, month and date.

function createDate(str, year, month, _date) {
  var d = new Date(year, month, _date);
  if (d.getFullYear() != year 
    || d.getMonth() != month
    || d.getDate() != _date) {
    throw "invalid date";
  }
  return d;
}

For details, refer to Check date in javascript

share|improve this answer
// check whether date is valid
var t = new Date('2011-07-07T11:20:00.000+00:00x');
valid = !isNaN(t.valueOf());
share|improve this answer
3  
It's the same @Borgar wrote 2 years ago... What's new?? –  bluish Dec 23 '11 at 13:34
    
It's two lines instead of ugly nested if statements. –  Cypher May 24 '13 at 18:53

None of the above solutions worked for me what did work however is

function validDate (d) {
        var date = new Date(d);
        var day = ""+date.getDate();
        if( day.length == 1)day = "0"+day;
        var month = "" +( date.getMonth() + 1);
        if( month.length == 1)month = "0"+month;
        var year = "" + date.getFullYear();

        return ((month + "/" + day + "/" + year) == d);
    }

the code above will see when JS makes 02/31/2012 into 03/02/2012 that its not valid

share|improve this answer
1  
Ok, but this tests if a string is a date in a M/D/Y format, not "the difference between valid and invalid date objects". It's not really what this is question about. –  Borgar Sep 1 '12 at 12:00
    
the reason why its checked against the format is to check if the date has changed after it was parsed –  John Sep 10 '12 at 11:29

Inspired by Borgar's approach I have made sure that the code not only validates the date, but actually makes sure the date is a real date, meaning that dates like 31/09/2011 and 29/02/2011 are not allowed.

function(dateStr) {
    s = dateStr.split('/');
    d = new Date(+s[2], s[1]-1, +s[0]);
    if (Object.prototype.toString.call(d) === "[object Date]") {
        if (!isNaN(d.getTime()) && d.getDate() == s[0] && 
            d.getMonth() == (s[1] - 1)) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return "Invalid date!";
}
share|improve this answer
    
But... methods above (@Borgar's and the others) already checks for this type of validity... I can't get the issue. –  bluish Dec 23 '11 at 13:30
    
Borgar's doesn't - see his own comment to his answer. –  EML Dec 29 '13 at 22:09

Date object to string is more simple and reliable way to detect if both fields are valid date. e.g. If you enter this "-------" to the date input field. Some of the above answers won't work.

jQuery.validator.addMethod("greaterThan", 

    function(value, element, params) {
        var startDate = new Date($(params).val());
        var endDate = new Date(value);

        if(startDate.toString() === 'Invalid Date' || endDate.toString() === 'Invalid Date') {
            return false;
        } else {
            return endDate > startDate;
        }
    },'Must be greater than {0}.');
share|improve this answer

None of these answers worked for me (tested in Safari 6.0) when trying to validate a date such as 2/31/2012, however, they work fine when trying any date greater than 31.

So I had to brute force a little. Assuming the date is in the format mm/dd/yyyy. I am using @broox answer:

Date.prototype.valid = function() {
    return isFinite(this);
}    

function validStringDate(value){
    var d = new Date(value);
    return d.valid() && value.split('/')[0] == (d.getMonth()+1);
}

validStringDate("2/29/2012"); // true (leap year)
validStringDate("2/29/2013"); // false
validStringDate("2/30/2012"); // false
share|improve this answer
    
(new Date('2/30/2014')).valid() returns true –  André Figueiredo Jan 31 at 11:39
1  
Been a while since I've answered this but you may need both return conditions, including the && value.split('/')[0] == (d.getMonth()+1); –  Dex Jan 31 at 22:22

I think some of this is a long process. We can cut it short as shown below:

 function isValidDate(dateString) {
        debugger;
        var dateStringSplit;
        var formatDate;

        if (dateString.length >= 8 && dateString.length<=10) {
            try {
                dateStringSplit = dateString.split('/');
                var date = new Date();
                date.setYear(parseInt(dateStringSplit[2]), 10);
                date.setMonth(parseInt(dateStringSplit[0], 10) - 1);
                date.setDate(parseInt(dateStringSplit[1], 10));

                if (date.getYear() == parseInt(dateStringSplit[2],10) && date.getMonth()+1 == parseInt(dateStringSplit[0],10) && date.getDate() == parseInt(dateStringSplit[1],10)) {
                    return true;
                }
                else {
                    return false;
                }

            } catch (e) {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
The question asked for how to find invalid Date instances, not strings, and besides: who says a date can't be delimited by something other than a forward-slash? –  Jon z Dec 21 '12 at 22:22

you can check the valid format of txDate.value with this scirpt. if it was in incorrect format the Date obejct not instanced and return null to dt .

 var dt = new Date(txtDate.value)
 if (isNaN(dt))
share|improve this answer
IsValidDate: function(date) {
        var regex = /\d{1,2}\/\d{1,2}\/\d{4}/;
        if (!regex.test(date)) return false;
        var day = Number(date.split("/")[1]);
        date = new Date(date);
        if (date && date.getDate() != day) return false;
        return true;
}
share|improve this answer

This just worked for me

new Date('foo') == 'Invalid Date'; //is true

However this didn't work

new Date('foo') === 'Invalid Date'; //is false
share|improve this answer

you can convert your date and time to milliseconds getTime()

this getTime() Method return Not a Number NaN when not valid

if(!isNaN(new Date("2012/25/255").getTime()))
  return 'valid date time';
  return 'Not a valid date time';
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work !isNaN(new Date("2/30/2012").getTime()) returns true –  Dex Feb 1 at 23:17

I've written this function. Pass it a string parameter and it will determine whether it's a valid date or not based on this format "dd/MM/yyyy".

here is a test

input: "hahaha",output: false.

input: "29/2/2000",output: true.

input: "29/2/2001",output: false.

function isValidDate(str) {
    var parts = str.split('/');
    if (parts.length < 3)
        return false;
    else {
        var day = parseInt(parts[0]);
        var month = parseInt(parts[1]);
        var year = parseInt(parts[2]);
        if (isNaN(day) || isNaN(month) || isNaN(year)) {
            return false;
        }
        if (day < 1 || year < 1)
            return false;
        if(month>12||month<1)
            return false;
        if ((month == 1 || month == 3 || month == 5 || month == 7 || month == 8 || month == 10 || month == 12) && day > 31)
            return false;
        if ((month == 4 || month == 6 || month == 9 || month == 11 ) && day > 30)
            return false;
        if (month == 2) {
            if (((year % 4) == 0 && (year % 100) != 0) || ((year % 400) == 0 && (year % 100) == 0)) {
                if (day > 29)
                    return false;
            } else {
                if (day > 28)
                    return false;
            }      
        }
        return true;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You can simply use moment.js

Here is an example:

var m = moment("2015-11-32");
m.isValid(); // false

The validation section in the documentation is quite clear.

And also, the following parsing flags result in an invalid date:

  • overflow: An overflow of a date field, such as a 13th month, a 32nd day of the month (or a 29th of February on non-leap years), a 367th day of the year, etc. overflow contains the index of the invalid unit to match #invalidAt (see below); -1 means no overflow.
  • invalidMonth: An invalid month name, such as moment('Marbruary', 'MMMM');. Contains the invalid month string itself, or else null.
  • empty: An input string that contains nothing parsable, such as moment('this is nonsense');. Boolean.
  • Etc.

Source: http://momentjs.com/docs/

share|improve this answer

For int 1-based components of a date:

var is_valid_date = function(year, month, day) {
    var d = new Date(year, month - 1, day);
    return d.getFullYear() === year && (d.getMonth() + 1) === month && d.getDate() === day
};

Tests:

    is_valid_date(2013, 02, 28)
&&  is_valid_date(2016, 02, 29)
&& !is_valid_date(2013, 02, 29)
&& !is_valid_date(0000, 00, 00)
&& !is_valid_date(2013, 14, 01)
share|improve this answer
var isDate_ = function(input) {
        var status = false;
        if (!input || input.length <= 0) {
          status = false;
        } else {
          var result = new Date(input);
          if (result == 'Invalid Date') {
            status = false;
          } else {
            status = true;
          }
        }
        return status;
      }
share|improve this answer

The selected answer is excellent, and I'm using it as well. However, if you're looking for a way to validate user date input, you should be aware that the Date object is very persistent about making what might appear to be invalid construction arguments into valid ones. The following unit test code illustrates the point:

QUnit.test( "valid date test", function( assert ) {
  //The following are counter-examples showing how the Date object will 
  //wrangle several 'bad' dates into a valid date anyway
  assert.equal(isValidDate(new Date(1980, 12, 15)), true);
  d = new Date();
  d.setFullYear(1980);
  d.setMonth(1);
  d.setDate(33);
  assert.equal(isValidDate(d), true);
  assert.equal(isValidDate(new Date(1980, 100, 150)), true);
  //If you go to this exterme, then the checker will fail
  assert.equal(isValidDate(new Date("This is junk")), false);
  //This is a valid date string
  assert.equal(isValidDate(new Date("November 17, 1989")), true);
  //but is this?
  assert.equal(isValidDate(new Date("November 35, 1989")), false);  
  //Ha!  It's not.  So, the secret to working with this version of 
  //isValidDate is to pass in dates as text strings... Hooboy
  //alert(d.toString());
});
share|improve this answer

I combined the best performance results I found around to check if a given object:

The result is the following:

function isValidDate(input) {
  if(!(input && input.getTimezoneOffset && input.setUTCFullYear))
    return false;

  var time = input.getTime();
  return time === time;
};
share|improve this answer

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