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I am populating a table with about 500 rows, which takes the browser a few seconds to render, while it appears frozen. This is why I want to display a message asking for the user's patience:

$.ajax({
  url: '{{ search_url }}',
  success: function (response) {
    $('#progress').text('Rendering results, please wait...');
    clear_table();
    populate_table(response);
  }
});

The message isn't displayed - apparently the browser (tested in Chrome 23) buffers all the DOM changes and renders them all in a single go.

As a workaround I found that when I delay populating the table until execution is back to the event loop the message is actually displayed:

$.ajax({
  url: '{{ search_url }}',
  success: function (response) {
    $('#progress').text('Rendering results, please wait...');
    window.setTimeout(function () {
      clear_table();
      populate_table(response);
    }, 0);
  }
});

I wonder if this method will always work or if there is a better technique for this case.

share|improve this question
1  
message should trigger before ajax call is started, not in the success callback –  charlietfl Nov 24 '12 at 0:13
2  
Yes, your setTimeout would be the appropriate solution, and it will always work. –  I Hate Lazy Nov 24 '12 at 0:25
    
...and also perhaps improving the performance of your populate_table. 500 rows isn't all that many, so it wouldn't seem like it should take too long to process. –  I Hate Lazy Nov 24 '12 at 0:28
    
Yes, seemed kind of strange to me, too. Well, it's jQuery and there's column width adjustment involved but I'll see if I can put together an isolated test case. –  AndreKR Nov 24 '12 at 0:29
    

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is happening because Javascript execution is single threaded. So until all your JS code is executed the browser will not do anything - in other words it will freeze. To prevent that I suggest you use the jQuery Async plugin (which is just a few lines of code) which will periodically give control back to the browser (by using setTimeout). This prevents the browser from freezing and will display the wait message without any problems.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice, since the populating is already an $.each, it's a like 20 character change. It uses the same technique as my workaround. –  AndreKR Nov 24 '12 at 0:49

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