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The Background

I'm trying to use Composer to manage dependencies for WordPress plugins. I've built several PHP libraries (RESTian & Sidecar) I want to include in subdirectories for each of several plugins we are building and those PHP libraries are hosted on GitHub. The WordPress plugins are (currently) hosted in private BitBucket repos as they are for clients but those plugins will also get published to WordPress plugin repository when we are ready to release them.

The Problem

I want a directory structure of /libraries/restian/ and /libraries/sidecar/ relative to the root of the plugin. For those who know WordPress they would ultimately look like this installed:

/wp-content/plugins/my-wp-plugin/libraries/restian/
/wp-content/plugins/my-wp-plugin/libraries/sidecar/

Problem is I've only been able to get Composer to put them within a /newclarity/ subdirectory which is more complexity than I want to add to the directory structure of the plugin ('newclarity' is our GitHub account):

/wp-content/plugins/my-wp-plugin/libraries/newclarity/restian/
/wp-content/plugins/my-wp-plugin/libraries/newclarity/sidecar/

The Source

Here is the composer.json file that I am using to research and test this:

{
  "name":"mikeschinkel/my-wp-plugin",
  "description":"My WordPress Plugin",
  "type":"wordpress-plugin",
  "config":{
    "vendor-dir":"libraries/"
  },
  "require": {
    "newclarity/restian":"dev-master",
    "newclarity/sidecar":"dev-master"
  },
  "repositories":[
    {
      "type":"git",
      "url":"https://github.com/newclarity/restian.git"
    },
    {
      "type":"git",
      "url":"https://github.com/newclarity/sidecar.git"
    }
  ]
}

And here are the current composer.json files from the libraries hosted at GitHub:

{
  "name": "newclarity/restian",
  "description": "RESTian: A base class library to simplify building RESTful/Web API clients in PHP",
  "require": {
      "php": ">=5.2.4"
  }
}

And:

{
  "name": "newclarity/sidecar",
  "description": "Sidecar: The Missing Plugin API for WordPress",
  "require":{
    "php":">=5.2.4"
  }
}

I've been researching this for over 4 hours now. Any help would be appreciated.

-Mike

share|improve this question
    
Is it required to have a single folder for the packages beside "I want"? –  KingCrunch Nov 24 '12 at 0:38
    
It's not a requirement per se, but it adds noise that makes working with the libraries more complex then they need to be. We ultimately want to see many other WordPress plugin developers use these libraries and they are notoriously finicky about avoiding things that look or feel "too complex". Much more so than the average PHP developer. –  MikeSchinkel Nov 24 '12 at 0:42
    
You should not blame your customers for that ;) You should not waste your time with such a ... optimization and start to believe, that they can handle an additional folder. With autoloading you usually don't even have to look into it ever ;) –  KingCrunch Nov 24 '12 at 0:47
    
Respectfully, please let me decide what I should "waste" my time on. If you don't think it's relevant then I'm happy for you not to answer. –  MikeSchinkel Nov 24 '12 at 0:51
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

So I came up with a solution that works, but it's inelegant and I was really hoping for a simple and elegant solution hence why I posted my question here on StackOverflow.

After no better answer here I posted on the Composer forum as a feature request and had the request closed because "where code is installed in most cases should not matter." It's sad that some people feel that what they value are the only things worth valuing.

Since it seems like there's no official way to do this and no interest on behalf of the Composer team to make it easier I decided to go ahead and post my solution in case others are beating their head against the wall in same way. It's ugly but it works.

Instead of referencing a Git repo create an "inline package" for each repo; here's what it looks like (NOTE: I added '#' comments which are of course not valid JSON but only here to callout what I changed.):

{
  "name":"mikeschinkel/my-wp-plugin",
  "description":"My WordPress Plugin",
  "type":"wordpress-plugin",
  "config":{
    "vendor-dir":"libraries"
  },
  "require": {
    "restian":"dev-master",  # Short name 'restian' used here.
    "sidecar":"dev-master"   # Short name 'sidecar' used here.
  },
  "repositories":[
    {
      "type":"package",      # type=package vs. type=git
      "package":{
        "name":"sidecar",    # Short name 'sidecar' used here.
        "version":"dev-master",
        "source":{           # This could be "dist" or "source"
          "type":"git",
          "url":"https://github.com/newclarity/sidecar",
          "reference":"master"
        }
      }
    },
    {
      "type":"package",      # type=package vs. type=git
      "package":{
        "name":"restian",    # Short name 'restian' used here.
        "version":"dev-master",
        "source":{           # This could be "dist" or "source"
          "type":"git",
          "url":"https://github.com/newclarity/restian",
          "reference":"master"
        }
      }
    }
  ]
}

Given that I'm new to Composer there might be numerous ways I could improve this; any suggestions are welcome. Either way I hope this helps others trying to achieve the same goal.

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You can try to use the wordpress-plugin type combined with the composer/installers package. Read more about this on the Installers README. It should do what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
The wordpress-plugin type doesn't provide what I'm looking for. It stores plugins and themes, but WordPress doesn't (yet?) recognize libraries as first class. –  MikeSchinkel Nov 24 '12 at 18:03
1  
Why would you need wordpress to recognize libraries as first class? Those can go in vendor/ or whatever directory, as long as you make sure composer's autoloader is active you will have access to the libraries. –  Seldaek Nov 25 '12 at 9:00
    
If WordPress recognized libraries as first class it could manage which ones are loaded at runtime by different plugins. I'm building WordPress sites but instead WordPress plugins that might need to co-exist in a WordPress site alongside other plugins I didn't write. Plugins are added/changed by users in real time not by a one-time configuration process that. Ideally WordPress core would add functionality like this library I wrote to manage loading only compatible libraries. –  MikeSchinkel Nov 26 '12 at 2:32
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Problem is I've only been able to get Composer to put them within a /newclarity/ subdirectory which is more complexity than I want to add to the directory structure of the plugin ('newclarity' is our GitHub account):

Nope, thats not true, at least not true in how you meant it. Composer creates the newclarity-folder, because you specify it within the composer.json as part of the package name, for example

"name": "newclarity/sidecar"

I don't know exactly, but you can try to just name it "sidecar". However, this is discouraged as conflicts between packages become more and more probably the more packages exists, thus you should stay with the two-level folder structure, if there is no higher requirement, that prevent this.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that suggestion. I actually already figured out your solution but wanted a better one for exactly the reason you stated when you said "this is discouraged as conflicts between packages." I want my repos to have "newclarity/restian" and "newclarity/sidecar" but in my WordPress plugin there's almost zero chance for conflict so I want more control of my local directory structure than I can figure out that Composer will provide. –  MikeSchinkel Nov 24 '12 at 0:50
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