Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

for this statement:

mysql <my_db_name> -u<user_name> -p<password> <mysql.sql

where does mymphpadmin assume mysql.sql is located in?

share|improve this question
    
It's a little confusing to use < and > in two entirely different ways in your example. The <> around my_db_name, user_name and password just emphasise that those things are to be replaced with actual values. The last one (in <mysql.sql) is the redirection operator. –  pavium Aug 30 '09 at 12:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

regarding gnuds second point:

Reading in a file via < is not specific to mysql. This works for any command and any file on the commandline. (on UNIX as well as on Windows):

somecommand < somefile

data from the file somefile is sent into the command via a channel called STDIN.

share|improve this answer

in the directory you are currently located in.

share|improve this answer

First, this is clearly not about phpMyAdmin, but about the mysql command line tool.

Second, in the command you posted, the mysql utility does not look for a file name at all, it reads stdin - your shell (like bash or the windows cmd) opens the file and sets it up as the stdin of mysql.

Thirdly, all relative filesystem paths (any path that doesn't start with a root), are relative to the current working directory.

share|improve this answer
    
im sorry can you elaborate on your second point please –  Yuck Aug 30 '09 at 12:13
    
Read about redirection at wikipedia, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redirection_%28computing%29 That was a link on the wikipedia page on stdin –  gnud Aug 30 '09 at 13:59

Yes, in the current working directory ... but you're not using myphpadmin, you're using the mysql command.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.