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I am working on an MVC project where controller actions deal with Assets. Different controllers take in the assetId parameter in different way: Some controllers simply get int assetId, other int id, and other using a complex object AssetDTO dto (which contains a property that holds the assetId)

I am writing an ActionFilter that is added to the action method and is provided with the actionParameter name where I can get the asset value.

Action Method:

    [AssetIdFilter("assetId")]
    public ActionResult Index(int assetId)
    {
            ...
    }

The attribute is defined as:

public class AssetIdFilterAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    public string _assetIdParameterKey { get; set; }

    public AssetIdFilterAttribute (string assetIdParameterKey)
    {
        _assetIdParameterKey = assetIdParameterKey;
    }

    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        int assetId;
        if (Int32.TryParse(filterContext.ActionParameters[_assetIdParameterKey].ToString(), out assetId))
        {
                    ......
        }
    }

This works as expected, but will only work when the assetId is provided as a primitive. I am not sure what to do when the assetId is provided within a complex object into the action method.

Will I need to parse each object differently depending on the type? I am hoping I can specify some kind of dot-notation in the AssetIdFilter to tell it where the assetId is located: dto.assetId

Any way I can use dynamics? or reflection?? ect.???

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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted
+50

and here dynamic comes to the rescue.you can change the actionFilterAttribute to be :

        public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
        {
            dynamic assetIdHolder = filterContext.ActionParameters[_assetIdParameterKey];
            if (assetIdHolder.GetType().IsPrimitive)
            {
                //do whatever with assetIdHolder              
            }
            else
            {
                //do whatever with assetIdHolder.assetId
            }
        }

cheers!

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Well, yes, you answered your question. One way would be to use dot notation:

//simple case:
[AssetId("id")]
public ActionResult Index(string id) {
    //code here
}

//complex case:
[AssetId("idObj", AssetIdProperty = "SubObj.id")]
public ActionResult index(IdObject idObj) {
    //code here
}

And AssetIdAttribute is as follows:

public class AssetIdAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    public string _assetIdParameterKey { get; set; }

    public string AssetIdProperty { get; set; }

    public AssetIdFilterAttribute(string assetIdParameterKey)
    {
        _assetIdParameterKey = assetIdParameterKey;
    }

    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        int assetId;
        var param = filterContext.ActionParameters[_assetIdParameterKey];
        int.TryParse(GetPropertyValue(param, this.AssetIdProperty).ToString(), out assetId);
        //you code continues here.
    }

    private static string GetPropertyValue(object souce, string property)
    {
        var propNames = string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(property) || !property.Contains('.') ? new string[] { } : property.Split('.');
        var result = souce;
        foreach (var prop in propNames)
        {
            result = result.GetType().GetProperty(prop).GetValue(result);
        }
        return result.ToString();
    }
}

The code does not have null checks when calling ToString and when calling GetProperty though. Also, it does not check the success of TryParse. Please apply these corrections when used.

Maybe this code could be written using dynamic, but at the end dynamic usage is compiled into object using reflection (something like what I have done here), thus no big difference to me.

Also, maybe it would be more clear to have a parameter like "idObj.SubObj.id", but that again depends on the preference, and the code will become a little bit more complex.

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