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I've read many different articles about JProgressBar...including the dodgy code found over at Java; here.

Most indicate you need a SwingWorker to get things happening properly, which makes perfect sense, I understand that much. I am finding that when I call setProgress(value) to update the progressbar, it's not triggering the propertyChange event most of the time. I've checked the value I'm passing to setProgess and it definitely changes every time, so I'm not sure if it's just firing the event too quickly? Please see relevant code below, any help/explanation would be greatly appreciated.

class ProgBar extends SwingWorker
{
    public ProgBar()
    {
        addPropertyChangeListener(new PropertyChangeListener()
        {
           @Override
           public void propertyChange(PropertyChangeEvent evt)
           {
               if ("progress".equals(evt.getPropertyName()))
               {
                   int value = (Integer)evt.getNewValue();
                   System.out.println("propertyChange called with: " + value);
                   loginProg.setValue(value);
               }
           }
        });

        loginProg.setStringPainted(true);
        loginProg.setValue(0);
        setProgress(0);
    }

    @Override
    public Void doInBackground() throws InterruptedException
    {
        ...
        int count = 0;
        for (Folder f : folders)
        {
            ... // process 'f'
            setProgress((int)Math.min(((double)count/folders.length)*100.0, 100.0));
        }
        ...
        return null;
    }

    @Override
    public void done()
    {
        System.out.println("Done called.");
        setProgress(100);
        loginProg.setValue(100);
    }
}

JProgressBar called with this;

private void jButtonActionPerformed(java.awt.event.ActionEvent evt) 
{                                             
        // Create new thread to run progess bar.
        // Otherwise won't be able to update progress bar.
        ProgBar pb = new ProgBar();
        pb.execute();
    }
}    

EDIT:
Yeah, so I should have read the Javadocs better;

Because PropertyChangeListeners are notified asynchronously on the Event Dispatch Thread multiple invocations to the setProgress method might occur before any PropertyChangeListeners are invoked. For performance purposes all these invocations are coalesced into one invocation with the last invocation argument only.

For example, the following invokations:
setProgress(1);
setProgress(2);
setProgress(3);

might result in a single PropertyChangeListener notification with the value 3.

I.E. my assumption that setProgress was firing too quickly was correct. A ProgressMonitor might be a better solution.

share|improve this question
2  
Consider creating and posting an sscce, a small compilable and runnable program that we can run unchanged and that demonstrates your problem for us. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Nov 24 '12 at 2:12
    
You state that your problem only occurs some of the time and not all of the time which gives off a strong smell of a Swing threading issue. Again, an sscce would help answer this issue -- but only if this question is important to you and you haven't yet gotten a correct answer. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Nov 24 '12 at 2:40
    
Umm, you could put a button and progress bar on a jpanel and then substitute "// process 'f'" with Thread.sleep(1000); and that would be an sscce I suppose. –  FizzBuzz Nov 24 '12 at 3:42
1  
Since you are the one asking for free help for your question, the onus of effort to create and post an SSCCE should be yours. Besides, I've already created one, and the code works, if the JProgressBar references are done correctly. Since there's no way I can guess how you're wiring this, I will leave it up to you to post your sscce to show us, but again only if the question is important to you. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Nov 24 '12 at 3:44
1  
-1 for insisting on not showing an SSCCE and voting to close (not a real question, because there is no problem) –  kleopatra Nov 24 '12 at 10:49

2 Answers 2

This isn't an answer but a demonstration sscce, to show you just what I meant:

import java.beans.PropertyChangeEvent;
import java.beans.PropertyChangeListener;
import java.util.Random;

import javax.swing.*;

public class TestProgBar {
   public static void main(String[] args) {
      SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
         public void run() {
            ProgBar progBar = new ProgBar();


            // **** this is key and where your code may be deficient ***
            JProgressBar prog = progBar.getProg(); 


            progBar.execute();
            JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, prog);
         }
      });
   }
}

class ProgBar extends SwingWorker<Void, Void> {
   private JProgressBar loginProg = new JProgressBar();

   public ProgBar() {
      addPropertyChangeListener(new PropertyChangeListener() {

         @Override
         public void propertyChange(PropertyChangeEvent evt) {
            if ("progress".equals(evt.getPropertyName())) {
               int value = (Integer) evt.getNewValue();
               System.out.println("propertyChange called with: " + value);
               loginProg.setValue(value);
            }
         }
      });

      loginProg.setStringPainted(true);
      loginProg.setValue(0);
      setProgress(0);
   }

   public JProgressBar getProg() {
      return loginProg;
   }

   @Override
   public Void doInBackground() throws InterruptedException {
      int count = 0;
      int max = 5;
      Random random = new Random();

      // simulate uploading files
      while (count < 100) {
         count += random.nextInt(max);
         if (count > 100) {
            count = 100;
         }
         setProgress(count);
         Thread.sleep(400);
      }
      // for (Folder f : folders) {
      // setProgress((int) Math.min(((double) count / folders.length) * 100.0,
      // 100.0));
      // }
      return null;
   }

   @Override
   public void done() {
      System.out.println("Done called.");
      setProgress(100);
      loginProg.setValue(100);
   }
}

Again, this code works fine, suggesting that the code you've loaded does not show the error. You need to do further work isolating the error and getting it into code so we can test it.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Yeah, so I should have read the Javadocs better;

Because PropertyChangeListeners are notified asynchronously on the Event Dispatch Thread multiple invocations to the setProgress method might occur before any PropertyChangeListeners are invoked. For performance purposes all these invocations are coalesced into one invocation with the last invocation argument only.

For example, the following invokations:
setProgress(1);
setProgress(2);
setProgress(3);
might result in a single PropertyChangeListener notification with the value 3.

I.E. my assumption that setProgress was firing too quickly was correct. A ProgressMonitor might be a better solution. I've confirmed this with the SSCCE and my program, both are simply firing setProgress too quickly and as a result, only the last value passed to setProgress is being passed through to the PropertyChange event.

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