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While having finished making a wrapper for my windows class, I did a test with some text to make sure everything was working okay. However, no matter if I delete or comment out the text "This is a test!!!!", when running the program, it still remains there during the executable run.

LRESULT CALLBACK WinMsgHandler(HWND hwnd, UINT uMsg, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam)
    {
        switch (uMsg)
        {
        case WM_PAINT:
            PAINTSTRUCT ps;
            HDC hdc;

            //hdc = BeginPaint(hwnd, &ps); 

            //TextOut(hdc, 0, 0, L"This is a TEST!!!", 17);

            //EndPaint(hwnd, &ps);
            break;
        case WM_DESTROY:
            bWindowClosed = TRUE;
            break;
        case WM_CREATE:
            MessageBox(NULL, L"Create", L"test", MB_OK);
            break;
        default:
            return CBaseWindow::WinMsgHandler(hwnd, uMsg, wParam, lParam);
        }

        return 0;
    };

EDIT:

Here is the winmain source file. I have a feeling it has something to do with the way I bracketed everything. CDerivedWindow is a wrapper class for encapsulating most of the window initialization process.

int APIENTRY _tWinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance,
                     HINSTANCE hPrevInstance,
                     LPTSTR    lpCmdLine,
                     int       nCmdShow)
{

    CDerivedWindow mainWnd(hInstance);

    WNDCLASSEX wcx; 

    // Fill in the window class structure with default parameters 
    wcx.cbSize = sizeof(WNDCLASSEX);                            // size of structure 
    wcx.style = CS_HREDRAW | CS_VREDRAW;                        // redraw if size changes 
    wcx.lpfnWndProc = CBaseWindow::stWinMsgHandler;             // points to window procedure 
    wcx.cbClsExtra = 0;                                         // no extra class memory 
    wcx.cbWndExtra = 0;                                         // no extra window memory 
    wcx.hInstance = hInstance;                                  // handle to instance 
    wcx.hIcon = LoadIcon(NULL, IDI_APPLICATION);                // predefined app. icon 
    wcx.hCursor = LoadCursor(NULL, IDC_ARROW);                  // predefined arrow 
    wcx.hbrBackground = (HBRUSH)GetStockObject(WHITE_BRUSH);    // white background brush 
    wcx.lpszMenuName = NULL;                                    // name of menu resource 
    wcx.lpszClassName = L"True Wild";                           // name of window class 
    wcx.hIconSm = LoadIcon(NULL, IDI_APPLICATION);              // small class icon 

    initSprites();

    // register the window
    if (mainWnd.RegisterWindow(&wcx))
    {
        DWORD dwError = 0;
        DWORD dwStyle = WS_OVERLAPPEDWINDOW | WS_VISIBLE;
        RECT rc;

        rc.top = 100;
        rc.left = 100;
        rc.right = SCREEN_WIDTH;
        rc.bottom = SCREEN_HEIGHT;

        // create the window and start the message loop
        // we will get kicked out of the message loop when the window closes
        if (mainWnd.Create(dwStyle, &rc))
        {
            // message loop
            MSG msg;


            //game Loop
            while (TRUE)
            {
                while(PeekMessage(&msg, NULL, 0, 0, PM_REMOVE))
                { 
                    // Translate the message and dispatch it to WindowProc()
                    TranslateMessage(&msg);
                    DispatchMessage(&msg);

                    if (mainWnd.IsWindowClosed())
                        return 0;

                }


                //Run game code
                render();
            }
            return 0;
        }
        else
            return -1;
    }
    else
        return -2;

    return 0;
}

EDIT for Answer 1:

// the message handler for this window
LRESULT CALLBACK WinMsgHandler(HWND hwnd, UINT uMsg, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam)
{
    switch (uMsg)
    {
    case WM_DESTROY:
        bWindowClosed = TRUE;
        break;
    default:
        return DefWindowProc(hwnd, uMsg, wParam, lParam);
    }

    return DefWindowProc(hwnd, uMsg, wParam, lParam);
};
share|improve this question
    
If it's the only place you have it and it's commented out and still appearing, you're not building that source. –  chris Nov 24 '12 at 2:22
    
try to Clean solution and build solution again –  billz Nov 24 '12 at 2:23
    
Yeah, I did a clean and a rebuild before. Nothing changed. –  Cdore Nov 24 '12 at 2:24
    
Are you sure that (a) the compile succeeds and (b) you are executing the freshly compiled binary? –  Nik Bougalis Nov 24 '12 at 2:25
    
I sure am. This is a rather bizarre issue. Something isn't getting cleared somewhere. –  Cdore Nov 24 '12 at 2:31

1 Answer 1

If you don't handle WM_PAINT, you should pass it to DefWindowProc() to validate the client area and repaint the window.

It looks like you are breaking out of the switch/case and returning 0. I would replace:

return 0;

with

return DefWindowProc(hwnd, uMsg, wParam, lParam);
share|improve this answer
    
That is already done through default: return CBaseWindow::WinMsgHandler(hwnd, uMsg,wParam, lParam);, which calls the base class's function of DefWindowProc(). Unless you are telling me to call it in the PAINT case, too? –  Cdore Nov 24 '12 at 3:01
    
Ah, I cannot believe I didn't fix that. But alas, still the same issue. I might have to put making a wrapper class on hold so I can continue with my actual project. –  Cdore Nov 24 '12 at 3:07
1  
It looks like you are breaking out of the switch/case on a WM_PAINT message and the default case is never reached. Also, whenever you declare a variable within a case, you want to surround the entire case with curly brackets: stackoverflow.com/questions/92396/… –  user987280 Nov 24 '12 at 3:07
    
Yeah, I fixed that up. I sometimes forget the rules of switch cases, so I should make it a habit to always throw those on there. It didn't fix it, however, even when arranging the order. It's just one of those issues that involves something being out of order. Windows are strict to deal with to begin with. –  Cdore Nov 24 '12 at 3:12
    
One other odd thing that stands out is the way you handle WM_DESTROY. Usually it's handled by calling PostQuitMessage(0); so that a WM_QUIT message is inserted in your message queue. I don't know what's happening with bWindowClosed but you probably know that already. I was just thinking that maybe the window was never destroyed properly, because WM_DESTROY is sent after the window is removed from the screen but before it's destroyed. –  user987280 Nov 24 '12 at 3:27

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