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I am having issue returning a pointer to a struct. Can some explain what I am doing wrong? I want the search() to return a pointer to the matching input. That will be stored into a vector in case their are duplicates in the "array". This seems to work however I cannot get the "data" from the pointer returned?

struct Node
{
    int data;
    Node *left;
    Node *next;
};

vector<Node *> array;


void find(int & input)
{
     currentSize = 0;
     vector<Node *> hold;

    for( int i = 0; i < array.size( ); i++ ){
        if(search(array[i], input) != NULL)
        {
            hold.push_back(search(array[i], input));
        }
        else{
            cout << "The Key is not found" << endl;
        }

    }

    for(int i = 0; i < hold.size(); i++)
    {
        cout << hold[i] << endl;
        //Problem here:: I want to see the "data" that the search function returned not the hex value
    }
}


Node * search(Node * x, const int & input)
{
    if( x == NULL )
    {
       return NULL;
    }
    else
    {
        if(input == x->element)
        {
            return x;
        }
            search(x->left, input);
            search(x->next, input);
    }
}
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closed as too localized by Jonathan Leffler, WhozCraig, David Segonds, Bo Persson, stealthyninja Nov 24 '12 at 8:58

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I would that your x->element in the search() function won't compile either. As Zack points out, your coding standard is a bit weak. But at least you're trying. With time you'll learn assuming you stick to it. –  Alexis Wilke Nov 24 '12 at 2:56
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to turn compiler warnings on.

Not all code paths of search return a value, in particular, is the warning you should be getting if your compiler isn't being brain dead.

To fix this, replace this:

            search(x->left, input);
            search(x->next, input);
    }
}

with:

            Node* leftSearch = search(x->left, input);
            if (leftSearch)
              return leftSearch;
            return search(x->next, input);
    }
}

The search() recursive calls do not automatically ferry their return values over to the return value of the current function. :)

In addition, as noted by Zack, you need to look at some subfield of the Node to print it. First check if the return value is nullptr (or NULL in non-C++11 capable compilers) (if it is null, you can't dereference it safely, and it indicates the search failed).

If it isn't nullptr', do a ->data on it before you print.

Ie, change:

    cout << hold[i] << endl;

to:

    if (hold[i]) {
      cout << "Found: " << hold[i]->data << "\n";
    } else {
      cout << "Not Found\n";
    }

note that I'm not using std::endl, because I don't see the need to flush the buffer on each line.

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I made the changes as you suggested Yakk and it works thank you. However I am kinda confused with understanding why the changes to the search( ) does indeed work. I am trying to find all the places the x->data match the input and return that pointer but in the code Node* leftSearch = search(x->left, input); if (leftSearch) return leftSearch; return search(x->next, input); –  user1771695 Nov 24 '12 at 3:49
    
Does it actually still check if(input == x->element) ? –  user1771695 Nov 24 '12 at 3:50
    
This is recursive reasoning. You probably haven't seen induction, have you? But the idea is that the recursive calls to search will only return non-null if anything off that node has the answer. If it returns non-null, it has found the answer, so we don't have to check it, and can just relay it up. If it return null, we check the other node pointer and see if there is any answer in there. –  Yakk Nov 24 '12 at 4:04
1  
Oh yes, and you do need to replace x->element with x->data (x has no field called element) –  Yakk Nov 24 '12 at 4:05
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You are printing hold[i], which is a pointer to a Node, not hold[i]->data, which is what it appears you wanted to print.

Also this code almost certainly leaks like a sieve and/or corrupts the heap, but you haven't showed enough code for me to tell you what's wrong there.

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When I printed the hold[i]->data I got some unreadable character followed by a seg fault. –  user1771695 Nov 24 '12 at 3:40
    
@user1771695 That means hold[i] points to something other than a Node. –  Zack Nov 24 '12 at 14:14
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        search(x->left, input);
        search(x->next, input);

the result of these two calls is just ignored. You probably should store the result of the first search, and if that is not NULL, return it, otherwise return the result of the second search

Node* res = search(x->left, input);
if (res) return res;
return search(x->next, input);
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