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Hi to all i am new here and i have heard a lot about this website that it really helps you out. Hope you will be able to help me out!.

I have a very simple program which its only aim is to read from a serial port and prints it on the console window in C# for 2000 times.

I am just turning a variable resistor on a micro-controller that's all

Here below is the code

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.IO.Ports;

namespace Testing_serial_v3._0
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {

            string buff;


            SerialPort port = new SerialPort("COM4", 9600, Parity.None, 8, StopBits.One);
            port.Open();

            for (int i = 0; i < 2000; i++)
            {


                buff = port.ReadLine();
                Console.WriteLine(buff);
                //Console.ReadLine();
            }
        }
    }
}

But there is a funny thing happening in this code. When the console readline is commented as shown in the code above the value from the port changes as i turn the knob of the variable resistor. So this means it is working good. On the other hand if i make the readline happen so that after each value i have to press a key the port reads the current value and even though i change the knob and press enter again the value will remain the first as if it is not resetting at all?

Do you have to include any other command lines so that the port will reset?

Hope you understand my problem and any other questions you need to know please don't hesitate i really need this problem fixed ASAP. Many thanks and regards

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3 Answers

The data coming through the port is a stream - when you read, you are gradually consuming the stream. You are not seeing "the most recent value", you are seeing "the next value in the stream". When you add the read-line, you add a delay which means there is a large backlog of data. It isn't that "it stayed the same"... Simply that you haven't read to the end (and the more recent values) yet.

In many cases, it would be preferable to deal with the network IO via an async callback so that reading values from the stream is not tied into delays like human data entry. That may involve some knowledge of threading, though.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi marc thanks for your reply. I am a newbie in serial port and threading can you please explain more simple or maybe paste an example code so that i may be able to understand. –  Mystic Jay Nov 24 '12 at 9:38
    
@MysticJay I'm not at a computer for writing samples... and I'm not sure there is such a thing as "simple" when threading (especially in a console, where UI is tricky to coordinate between threads). However, in your example it may be reasonable to simply have a second thread that does nothing except read from the port until the port closes (so synchronous on a second thread, rather than asynchronous - much simpler) –  Marc Gravell Nov 24 '12 at 9:47
    
I appriciete your help but still i cannot find anything unfortunatly regarding what i am understanding from what you are saying. :/ –  Mystic Jay Nov 24 '12 at 9:58
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You are sending thousands of data from micro-controller to the serial port (with delay of 1ms for ex.), which makes the buffer of the serial port filled with same values! If you read it one by one by pressing enter key, you are reading the first received ones...

I think if you want to read your data in computer by "Enter" key, you should send the date from micro-controller by a push button! It means you set the value by resistor, press the push button, the micro sends "One Byte" to the computer. You press the enter on the computer and let your computer read just "One Byte" from the serial port!

Also some modification to your code:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int buff;  // string to int

    SerialPort port = new SerialPort("COM4", 9600, Parity.None, 8, StopBits.One);
    port.Open();

    for (int i = 0; i < 2000; i++)
    {
        Console.ReadLine();  // wait for the Enter key
        buff = port.ReadByte();  // read a byte
        Console.WriteLine(buff);
    }
}

I hope this will work for you! :)

share|improve this answer
    
This is just a simple code. The other project i am working on does not allow me to make a push button for it to read. It has to be everything automatic. If i can explain. The other project is sort of a balance i recieve the weight work the rest of the project and go get another weight. The problem that the weight is not changing. This is just as simple program i made so that i can make an example. Hope you understand what i am saying. –  Mystic Jay Nov 24 '12 at 10:08
    
For example cant i Open the port, read close again the port reset it and start again? By resetting i mean removing all data that was sent on the serial port so that it will read the new data? –  Mystic Jay Nov 24 '12 at 10:14
    
Understood! Try this one! before opening the port add "port.ReadBufferSize = 1;" It makes the size of the input buffer of the serial port to 1! let the micro send the value in automatic time interval (it will overwrite the same one byte!). then try the above code. each time you press the enter, you read just one byte that is existed! and don't forget to close the port while you are exiting the program! ;) –  Shamim Nov 24 '12 at 10:22
    
Now it stops at port.open(); saying The data is invalid (when debugging) –  Mystic Jay Nov 24 '12 at 10:26
    
I can use the discard but which one should i use discardout or discardin and how to use them bec i tried both and with out i get the same value and with in it changes but most of the time is scrabbled :/ –  Mystic Jay Nov 24 '12 at 10:31
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You could also use a Task to read it in a separate thread and observe it there, kind of what @Marc Gravel mentions. You just have to wait until the task is finished or press enter to cancel it manually. Just another example of offloading the task to another thread.

Here's an example:

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace ReadStreamAsyncTask
{
    internal class Program
    {
        private static CancellationToken _cancelTaskSignal;
        private static byte[] _serialPortBytes;
        private static MemoryStream _streamOfBytesFromPort;
        private static CancellationTokenSource _cancelTaskSignalSource;

        private static void Main()
        {
            _serialPortBytes = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes("Mimic a bunch of bytes from the serial port");
            _streamOfBytesFromPort = new MemoryStream(_serialPortBytes);
            _streamOfBytesFromPort.Position = 0;

            _cancelTaskSignalSource = new CancellationTokenSource();
            _cancelTaskSignal = _cancelTaskSignalSource.Token; // Used to request cancel the task if needed.

            var readFromSerialPort = Task.Factory.StartNew(ReadStream, _cancelTaskSignal);
            readFromSerialPort.Wait(3000); // wait until task is complete(or errors) OR 3 seconds

            Console.WriteLine("Press enter to cancel the task");
            _cancelTaskSignalSource.Cancel();
            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        private static void ReadStream()
        {
            // start your loop here to read from the port and print to console

            Console.WriteLine("Port read task started");

            int bytesToReadCount = Buffer.ByteLength(_serialPortBytes);
            var localBuffer = new byte[bytesToReadCount];

            int bytesRead = 0;

            bool finishedReading = false;

            try
            {
                while (!finishedReading)
                {
                    _cancelTaskSignal.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();

                    bytesRead += _streamOfBytesFromPort.Read(localBuffer, 0, bytesToReadCount);

                    finishedReading = (bytesRead - bytesToReadCount == 0);
                }
            }
            catch (TaskCanceledException)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("You cancelled the task");
            }

            Console.WriteLine(Encoding.ASCII.GetString(localBuffer));
            Console.WriteLine("Done reading stream");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can you apply this task to my example and make it to end the task automatically rather than pressing enter to end if possible please i really need this help please –  Mystic Jay Nov 24 '12 at 10:36
    
Pressing enter is just to signal cancellation, the task might actually complete before you manually press enter, after which it has no effect. This task is rather trivial and will complete. In your case, you can choose to use the Task.Wait() method without any params to wait until the task is complete thus observing on the console what the task is printing. –  leon Nov 24 '12 at 10:41
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