Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Edited: Add intl chars as `Séléction' and a quote in filename

I have downloaded a lot of files in one directory, but many of them are stored with URL escaped filename, containing sign percents folowed by two hexadecimal chars, like:

ls -ltr $HOME/Downloads/
-rw-r--r-- 2 user user 13171425 24 nov 10:07 Swisscom%20Mobile%20Unlimited%20Kurzanleitung-%282011-05-12%29.pdf
-rw-r--r-- 2 user user  1525794 24 nov 10:08 31010ENY-HUAWEI%20E173u-1%20HSPA%20USB%20Stick%20Quick%20Start-%28V100R001_01%2CEnglish%2CIndia-Reliance%2CC%2Ccolor%29.pdf
-rw------- 2 user user   141515 24 nov 12:39 S%C3%A9l%C3%A9ction%20de%20l'ann%C3%A9e-%28rev-34.01%29.pdf
...

All theses names match the following form whith exactly 3 parts:

  • Name of the object -( Revision, and/or Date, useless ... ). Extension

In same command, I would like to obtain unde

My goal is to having one command to rename all this files to obtain:

-rw-r--r-- 2 user user 13171425 24 nov 10:07 Swisscom_Mobile_Unlimited_Kurzanleitung.pdf
-rw-r--r-- 2 user user  1525794 24 nov 10:08 31010ENY-HUAWEI_E173u-1_HSPA_USB_Stick_Quick_Start.pdf
-rw------- 2 user user   141515 24 nov 12:39 Séléction_de_l'année.pdf

I've successfully do the job in full bash with:

urlunescape() {
    local srce="$1" done=false part1 newname ext
    while ! $done ;do
        part1="${srce%%%*}"
        newname="$part1\\x${srce:${#part1}+1:2}${srce:${#part1}+3}"
        [ "$part1" == "$srce"  ] &&
            done=true ||
            srce="$newname"
      done
    newname="$(echo -e $srce)"
    ext=${newname##*.}
    newname="${newname%-(*}"
    echo ${newname// /_}.$ext
}
for file in *;do
    mv -i "$file" "$(urlunescape "$file")"
  done
ls -ltr
-rw-r--r-- 2 user user 13171425 24 nov 10:07 Swisscom_Mobile_Unlimited_Kurzanleitung.pdf
-rw-r--r-- 2 user user  1525794 24 nov 10:08 31010ENY-HUAWEI_E173u-1_HSPA_USB_Stick_Quick_Start.pdf
-rw------- 2 user user   141515 24 nov 12:39 Séléction_de_l'année.pdf

or using sed, tr, bash ... and sed:

for file in *;do
    echo -e $(
        echo $file |
            sed 's/%\(..\)/\\x\1/g'
      ) |
        sed 's/-(.*\.\([^\.]*\)$/.\1/' |
        tr \ \\n _\\0 |
        xargs -0 mv -i "$file"
  done
ls -ltr
-rw-r--r-- 2 user user 13171425 24 nov 10:07 Swisscom_Mobile_Unlimited_Kurzanleitung.pdf
-rw-r--r-- 2 user user  1525794 24 nov 10:08 31010ENY-HUAWEI_E173u-1_HSPA_USB_Stick_Quick_Start.pdf
-rw------- 2 user user   141515 24 nov 12:39 Séléction_de_l'année.pdf

But, I'm sure, there must exist simplier and/or shorter way to do this.

This shell script will recreate a directory whith the 3 files from the sample:

#!/bin/bash
perl -w << eof | gunzip | gunzip | tar -xv
my\$u="";sub d{my\$l=pack("c",32+.75*length(\$_[0]));print unpack("u",\$l.
\$_[0]);"";}while(<DATA>){/filename=(.*)/&&do{d(\$u);\$u="";close STDOUT;
open STDOUT,">\$1";undef\$_;next};tr#A-Za-z0-9+/##cd;tr#A-Za-z0-9+/# -_#
;\$u.=\$_;while(\$u=~s/(.{80})/d(\$1)/egx){};};d(\$u);__DATA__
H4sIAALAsFAAA+3Z20uTARjH8ZkXehE5bOYhclhgIZotENNKaehFFk7N0cJiqdk03Zx5mAf0HdQ8oJki
ufRNI1HDaW4q+NYMF0ydIbk0z7OZypvJpjHc1DnfLRKiP0Gj53P13H6vfhcPtdyRdOiDLIpkr59gpC+H
uTncRShs38irnKGcce0ZZsudaHJaLPk0xSOQhc4xrcKB15wILGZL5ic+5me5FLNbgNcl693VHXKU5uni
73Nvg7x+flSzfYFKoYl6y7LT6DceuyUml3cXzqrkgpk1sabbd6qEhyFNC5lrL9tWx4w/dOUZLLZRaXH1
WI5/ElrtJTKOYVXTCu5KeJ6Brt6oLjEtVC7XjFhuWzgPTGqrNLF0cdfC9k4/y0BCkLgWvueKKd4503Tf
oEypHBkMNMtntm7+zLTmvlWHN74nmiNUoYNkLV5IpA7bgi5Sp9CirYJO7ZH2oqC8ae4Ozp/Ej3PMggDe
EPdZZCvWrrPlH+rnS7usAjR/s2xD0RBgHmZQR23nnvb0OrY1qOubDktpduxtsxMJAADAP2wX2ZsuP0mP
PPjy7Lxqsp9a4iNiiv1Raa2SjyjQ2NVcDUFrQ1NKmcF12s5O26CbFyriizO0Qyp3ek198FT49VfchBPf
uevihFJudLErYtHLNP5Y0q0Op688W5hiZc5uvyv/+ObyZq/Wqhf0tRtaIxb7DFjRF3zp4YwxkOiPw3c0
yk0pLlvdIeJZDEnWC3pFzefIBMn4R2NONjHxNzzo2jsJyhqgzHkX53XoTjbLP0UXTz8XKnmK+dqkrpCs
PuIo0ZjqsN+5AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAB4hQoXlk7/z7umJjY6eiDswLCQAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA/xNh
C0lnR1SQqpZIvwAHqfcAVzoAAA==
eof
share|improve this question
    
Its seems here nothing to do with Perl. –  PSIAlt Nov 24 '12 at 11:01
    
@PSIAlt : Yes, there is! –  F. Hauri Nov 24 '12 at 11:17

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why not something like this:

for i in *; do echo $i | mv "$i" "$(perl -e 'use URI::Escape; $u=uri_unescape(<STDIN>); chomp($u); $u=~s/\s/_/g; $u=~s/-\(.*\)//; print $u;')"; done;

using a different syntax it becames:

for i in *; do mv "$i" "$(perl -MURI::Escape -e '$u=uri_unescape($ARGV[0]); chomp($u); $u=~s/\s/_/g; $u=~s/-\(.*\)//; print $u;' "$i")"; done;

(and i fixed dobule quotes also)

EDIT: but this is much better:

rename 's/%([0-9A-Fa-f]{2})/chr(hex($1))/eg|s/\s/_/g|s/-\(.*\)//' *

rename supports renaming files using regexp. The first regexp is taken from here: http://search.cpan.org/dist/URI/URI/Escape.pm and that's exactly what uri_unescape does. Then we can join more regexp together in the same string using |. It looks clean and I've learnt something new :)

share|improve this answer
    
Nice way, but a lot away from guessed result... At all, this line is wrong: for i in *; do echo $1... where come this $1 from? –  F. Hauri Nov 24 '12 at 14:40
    
sorry i misspelled $i with $1, thanks –  fthiella Nov 24 '12 at 14:41
    
Ok, +1 as it's the shorter answer of this thread, and it work. Nice way, funny the echo $i | mv $i $(perl..., the syntax mv $i $(echo $i | perl ... work same, but... ok. Nota: There exist a shorter way/syntax! –  F. Hauri Nov 24 '12 at 14:58
    
thanks! i fixed something... but i am still thinking of how to make it shorter :) –  fthiella Nov 24 '12 at 15:16
1  
There is another nice use of rename –  F. Hauri Dec 9 '13 at 12:46

Here's a quick way using sed:

for i in *; do mv "$i" "$(echo -e $(echo $i | sed -e 's/-%28.*\(\..*\)/\1/' -e 's/%20/_/g' -e 's/%\(..\)/\\x\1/g'))"; done

Results:

31010ENY-HUAWEI_E173u-1_HSPA_USB_Stick_Quick_Start.pdf
Séléction_de_l'année.pdf
Swisscom_Mobile_Unlimited_Kurzanleitung.pdf

Explanation:

1. Chops off the revision, and/or Date, etc, and keeps the extension
2. Changes spaces to underscores
3. Converts everything else
share|improve this answer
    
Nice, this is a simplier version as my 2nd sample, (little hard coded, but matching request) : +1! (But, there is a simplier way... ;) –  F. Hauri Nov 24 '12 at 14:52
    
Thanks mate. But are you going to keep us in suspense? I don't think there could be a method that is that much simpler ... but I've been wrong before. –  Steve Nov 24 '12 at 15:02
    
Much simplier, Yes, it is. My answer will by posted there if nobody suggest them in less than 24hours. For info: it's clean and length is less than 60 characters, only one command from shell command line. –  F. Hauri Nov 24 '12 at 15:08
    
I'll think about it :-) –  Steve Nov 24 '12 at 15:31
    
Best answer was found by @fthiella! You could take a look;-) –  F. Hauri Nov 24 '12 at 17:53

If you have Perl 5.14,

perl -MURI::Escape -e'
   rename $_, uri_unescape($_) =~ s/-\(.+\)\././r =~ tr/ /_/r
      for @ARGV;
' *

Line breaks added for readability. They can be removed.

share|improve this answer
    
Good! This is clean, simple, but too long. see @fthiella last update! –  F. Hauri Nov 24 '12 at 17:32

Yes! @fthiella was first to offer a solution based on rename utility from perl package!

NOTA: the word rename is the third, in the title of this thread. ;-)

apropos rename
...
mv (1)               - move (rename) files
prename (1)          - renames multiple files
rename (1)           - renames multiple files
rename (2)           - change the name or location of a file
rename.ul (1)        - Rename files
...

where man rename give:

SYNOPSIS
   rename [ -v ] [ -n ] [ -f ] perlexpr [ files ]

DESCRIPTION
   "rename" renames the filenames supplied according to the rule specified as
   the first argument.  The perlexpr argument is a Perl expression which is
   expected to modify the $_ string in Perl for at least some of the filenames
   specified....

So the first line I've hitted was:

rename 's/%(..)/chr hex $1/eg;y| |_|;s/-\(.*\././' *

I'ts really near the answer of @fthiella !

At all for more precise regex, .. (as [0-9A-Fa-f]{2} of fthiella) could better be written as \X{2}:

rename 's/%(\X{2})/chr hex $1/eg;y| |_|;s/-\(.*\)\././' *

But the post of @Borodin was first to enjoin me to take a tour at specialised modules so this answer is nice too:

rename 'use URI::Escape;$_=uri_unescape($_);y| |_|;s/-\(.*\)\././' *

or (I believe this is better, but I'm not sure!)

rename 'BEGIN{use URI::Escape};$_=uri_unescape($_);y| |_|;s/-\(.*\)\././' *

Thanks all!

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the question, for the explanation, and for the little suspance :) other answers are good also! –  fthiella Nov 25 '12 at 9:24
    
Yes, all working solution may match a pointed situation. My bash only sample work well too! Did you try them? –  F. Hauri Nov 25 '12 at 12:07

This is relatively straighforward using Perl's URI:Escape module. Unfortunately it is not a core module so you may need to install it.

use strict;
use warnings;

use URI::Escape;

while (glob '*') {
  my $newname = uri_unescape($_);
  $newname =~ s/-\(.+\)\././;
  $newname =~ tr/ /_/;
  rename $_, $newname;
}

output

-rw-r--r-- 2 user user 13171425 24 nov 10:07 Swisscom_Mobile_Unlimited_Kurzanleitung.pdf
-rw-r--r-- 2 user user  1525794 24 nov 10:08 31010ENY-HUAWEI_E173u-1_HSPA_USB_Stick_Quick_Start.pdf
-rw------- 2 user user   141515 24 nov 12:39 Séléction_de_l'année.pdf

As a one-liner: (Line breaks added for readability. They can be removed.)

perl -MURI::Escape -e'
   for (@ARGV) {
      $o = $_;
      $_ = uri_unescape($_);
      s/-\(.+\)\././;
      tr/ /_/;
      rename $o, $_;
   }
' *
share|improve this answer
    
Nice, this work fine! +1! But there is simplier form! –  F. Hauri Nov 24 '12 at 14:43
    
I always use if !-e $newname on mass renames. I've wiped out entire directories when I didn't. Tip: Do a dry run by changing rename to print. –  ikegami Nov 24 '12 at 16:40
cd Downloads
for i in *; do res=$( echo $i | sed 's/%[0-9][0-9]/_/g' ); mv $i $res; done 
share|improve this answer
    
No. this is wrong. –  F. Hauri Nov 24 '12 at 11:00
    
Yes,Not complete. Need to add some precondition test,like file name contain %20 . –  Amir Naghizadeh Nov 24 '12 at 11:04
    
Simply nuking escaped characters is not a good thing. –  Rhymoid Nov 24 '12 at 12:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.