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I am writing a system performance script in bash. I want to compute the CPU usage in terms of percent. I have two implementations, one using awk and another one using bc. I would like to know which of the two versions is more efficient. Is it better to use awk or bc for float computations? Thanks!

Version #1 (Using bc)

CPU=$(mpstat 1 1 | grep "Average" | awk '{print $11}')
CPU=$(echo "scale=2;(100-$CPU)" | bc -l)
echo $CPU

Version #2 (Using awk)

CPU=$(mpstat 1 1 | grep "Average" | awk '{idle = $11} {print 100 - idle}')
echo $CPU
share|improve this question
    
More "efficient" ? In what sense, exactly ? – Paul R Nov 24 '12 at 11:44
    
More efficient in terms of using less CPU cycles to perform the computation. I am looking for the method that causes less stress on the system. – Lynx Nov 24 '12 at 11:50
    
Have you tried running both of these 1000 times and timing that? – mbatchkarov Nov 24 '12 at 11:52
    
Thats a great idea! I will do that right now and post the results here! – Lynx Nov 24 '12 at 11:54
1  
In version 1, why do you need 2nd line? Why can't you do it from 1st line itself? I am asking because, 1st version is grep+awk+bc; 2nd example is grep+awk. So the comparison is not valid, I think. – anishsane Nov 24 '12 at 12:17
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Since the processing time of both is going to be tiny, the version that spawns the least amount of processes and subshells is going to be "more efficient".

That's your second example.

But you can make it even simpler by eliminating the grep:

CPU=$(mpstat 1 1 | awk '/Average/{print 100 - $11}')
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! Thank you very much! – Lynx Nov 24 '12 at 11:53

In version 1, why do you need 2nd line? Why can't you do it from 1st line itself? I am asking because, 1st version is grep+awk+bc; 2nd example is grep+awk. So the comparison is not valid, I think.

For using only bc, without awk, try this:

CPU=$(mpstat 1 1 | grep Average | { read -a P; echo 100 - ${P[10]}; } | bc )
share|improve this answer
    
No, you can't do it in pure bash since it involves floating point arithmetic. – gniourf_gniourf Nov 24 '12 at 12:12
    
^^ Yes, I forgot that. see the edit. – anishsane Nov 24 '12 at 12:26
    
The subshell is inefficient and useless. – gniourf_gniourf Nov 24 '12 at 12:28
    
Can it be done, without using a subshell? – anishsane Nov 24 '12 at 12:35
    
Yes, use groupings: { } instead of the subshell ( ). – gniourf_gniourf Nov 24 '12 at 13:04

I did the following benchmark:

#!/bin/bash

count=0
tic="$(date +%s)"
while [ $count -lt 50 ]
do
mpstat 1 1 | awk '/Average/{print 100 - $11}'
count=$(($count+1))
done
toc="$(date +%s)"
sec="$(expr $toc - $tic)"

count=0
tic="$(date +%s)"
while [ $count -lt 50 ]
do
CPU=$(mpstat 1 1 | grep "Average" | awk '{print $11}')
echo "scale=2;(100-$CPU)" | bc -l
count=$(($count+1))
done
toc="$(date +%s)"
sec1="$(expr $toc - $tic)"

echo "Execution Time awk: "$sec
echo "Execution Time bc: "$sec1

Both execution times were the same... 50 seconds. Apparently it does not make any difference.

share|improve this answer
2  
Of course there's no difference, you're blocking everything during 1 second (in the mpstat command) 50 times. Then, do the math. (Hint: 50*1=50). – gniourf_gniourf Nov 24 '12 at 14:08

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