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This might be a stupid question but I have no idea on this.

In Linux, Runlevel 2 stands for 'Multi-user mode without networking(NFS, etc)'

and Runlevel 3 stands for 'Multi-user mode with networking and no GUI'

But I still can't get the difference from name? What exactly is the difference?

If there's no networking in runlevel 2, how multiple user will connect to machine?

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closed as off topic by leonbloy, Pascal Cuoq, Mike Pennington, thkala, 0x499602D2 Nov 24 '12 at 13:50

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2 Answers

But I still can't get the difference from name? What exactly is the difference?

Runlevel 2 has no networking at all... Runlevel 3 allows networking, but has no graphical window manager

If there's no networking in runlevel 2, how multiple user will connect to machine?

Typically this isn't a level useful to multiple users, but you can handle multiple users if you have enough serial consoles available on the machine. The point is to contrast against single-user mode

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Depends on your local configuration and on the distribution. On Debian and i presume also on Ubuntu, the runlevels are as follow

0 - shutdown 1 - rescue mode 2 3 4 5 - Normal mode 6 - reboot

Your distribution might have a different default configuration. But you can configure them as you like to start and stops the services you want.

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