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I need to get a reference to the shared prefs from inside an abstract class called A that does not extend anything.

I cannot pass a Context object to this class to get the shared prefs because being abstract, I don't instantiate it. I created class A to be extended by other POJOs that share a single attribute, which is the uuid. The UUID is generated once in the app on its first run, which is why I store it in the shared prefs. In class A's constructor, I'm hoping to set the uuid based on what is in the shared prefs.

public abstract class A {
    private String uuid;
    public A() {
        // this is how I'm hoping to use the shared preferences
        this.uuid = sharedPrefs.getString("KEY_UUID", "null");
    }
    // getter and setter
}

One suggestion I found is to extend Application, say in a class called App, and include an attribute android:name=".App" in the <application> tag in the manifest. I imagine App will be written like this:

public class App extends Application {
    private static App app;
    public void onCreate() {
        this.app = this;
    }
    public static App getApp() {
        return app;
    }
}

...so that from inside class A, I can do this:

this.uuid = App.getApp().getSharedPreferences("prefs_name.txt", Context.MODE_PRIVATE).getString("KEY_UUID", "null");

However, doesn't the non-final static field app lose its reference to the App and become null when Android kills off the process or when the phone restarts? How can I get a reference to the shared prefs without using this method? Or should I just manually write the UUID to a file?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I cannot pass a Context object to this class to get the shared prefs because being abstract, I don't instantiate it.

Sure you can. Put Context as a parameter on the constructor. Or, put SharedPreferences as a parameter on the constructor, if you prefer. Your subclasses' constructors will need to take the same parameter and pass it to the super() call.

However, doesn't the non-final static field app lose its reference to the App and become null when Android kills off the process or when the phone restarts?

Well, the whole process is gone. Saying that it loses "its reference to the App and become null" is akin to saying that a person at ground zero of a nuclear blast will get a sunburn just prior to being vaporized -- while probably true, the point is a bit moot. :-)

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I was worried that passing this from activities and services that instantiate the child POJOs and then passing it on to A is not good design. But I guess I don't have much of a choice. –  Matt Nov 24 '12 at 13:06
    
@MattQuiros: Then don't pass this. Pass SharedPreferences. Or, better yet, pass the actual UUID string. Or, even better yet, if this UUID is unique for the whole process ("The UUID is generated once in the app on its first run, which is why I store it in the shared prefs"), put that in a static data member and skip loading it in each POJO. –  CommonsWare Nov 24 '12 at 13:15
    
The UUID is actually a unique identifier of the app installation, so it should never be generated again unless the user uninstalls and reinstalls the app. So I suppose I can't do your last suggestion and simply pass the UUID instead of this or the SharedPreferences. –  Matt Nov 24 '12 at 13:23
    
@MattQuiros: "So I suppose I can't do your last suggestion" -- my last suggestion was to cache the UUID in a static data member. You can certainly do that. Just initialize that static data member from your SharedPreferences before you start creating POJOs. You must already be doing a before-any-POJOs check to create that UUID on first run, so just stash the new-or-existing UUID in a static data member at that point. BTW, bear in mind that your UUID will be different for different users of the same device on Android 4.2+. –  CommonsWare Nov 24 '12 at 13:27
    
Thanks for the heads-up on 4.2, however if I store the UUID in a static data member, it will return to its original state when the process is killed off or the phone restarted. I tested it just now, initialized a global static int to -1 and incremented its values in the activity. When I restarted the phone and launched the app again, the int's value is back to -1. I hope I understood you correctly? –  Matt Nov 24 '12 at 13:59

Modify your App class to something like this:

public class App extends Application
{
    private static Context context;

    @Override
    public void onCreate()
    {
        super.onCreate();
        App.context = getApplicationContext();
    }

    public static Context getStaticContext()
    {
        return App.context;
    }
}
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Doesn't this have the same effect as the App code in the question? –  Matt Nov 24 '12 at 13:07

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