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class A {
     A(int i){    
        System.out.println("A(int)");
     }
 }

class B1 extends A{
    public static void main(String args[]){
        A ob=new A(2);  
    }
}
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2  
In future, please add a question in your content also. Plain code, might be clear here, but it will not always be. –  Rohit Jain Nov 24 '12 at 13:16

3 Answers 3

You have declared a 1-arg constructor in class A. So, compiler does not provide a default 0-arg constructor.

Now, in class B1, you have not defined any constructor, so compiler adds a default 0-arg constructor in that class, which looks like this: -

public B1() {
    super();
}

As you can see, Compiler adds a super() call to invoke the 0-arg constructor of the super class, which is class A, in this case.

Now, since your class A, does not have any 0-arg constructor, hence the error.


So, either you can add a 0-arg constructor in your class A: -

public A() {

}

This will solve the issue.


Or, add a 0-arg constructor in your class B1 explicitly, and add a super() call to the 1-arg constructor of class A: -

public B1() {
    super(0);  // Or any value
}

But, the problem in the 2nd solution will be that, from every constructor in your class B1, you would have to invoke the 1-arg constructor of class A explicitly. As soon as you miss one, you will get a compiler error immediately.

So, I would suggest to go with the 1st option. Add a 0-arg constructor in class A. And you are all good.

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+1 amazing answer and easy to understand. –  vels4j Nov 24 '12 at 13:25
    
+1 for the down to earth explanation........ –  Kumar Vivek Mitra Nov 24 '12 at 13:47
    
@KumarVivekMitra, vels4j.. Thanks :) –  Rohit Jain Nov 24 '12 at 13:49

Basically you need to define a constructor in the subclass, like this:

class B1 extends A{

    public B1(int x){
       super(x);
    }

    ...
}

OR

Add a default constructor in class A.

share|improve this answer
 class A {

    A(){
    }
    A(int i){    
        System.out.println("A(int)");
     }
 }

class B1 extends A{
    public static void main(String args[]){
        A ob=new A(2);  
    }
}

You have to give the default constructor in this case,because the A(int i) hides it and when you make the object of class a it shows error.The above my code works fine.

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Actually the code you posted will work fine. But the explanation you gave is quite confusing. It conveys that, creating an instance of class A using 1-arg constructor requires a 0-arg constructor also. Which is not the case. See my answer for better explanation/ –  Rohit Jain Nov 24 '12 at 13:43

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