Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I hava some problem with loading textures from directory. Maybe code first:

private Texture2D LoadTextureStream(string filePath)
{
    Texture2D file = null;
    RenderTarget2D result = null;

    try
    {
        using (System.IO.Stream titleStream = TitleContainer.OpenStream(filePath))
        {
            file = Texture2D.FromStream(GraphicsDevice, titleStream);
        }
    }
    catch
    {
        throw new System.IO.FileLoadException("Cannot load '" + filePath + "' file!");
    }
    PresentationParameters pp = GraphicsDevice.PresentationParameters;
    //Setup a render target to hold our final texture which will have premulitplied alpha values
    result = new RenderTarget2D(GraphicsDevice, file.Width, file.Height, true, pp.BackBufferFormat, pp.DepthStencilFormat);

    GraphicsDevice.SetRenderTarget(result);
    GraphicsDevice.Clear(Color.Black);

    //Multiply each color by the source alpha, and write in just the color values into the final texture
    BlendState blendColor = new BlendState();
    blendColor.ColorWriteChannels = ColorWriteChannels.Red | ColorWriteChannels.Green | ColorWriteChannels.Blue;

    blendColor.AlphaDestinationBlend = Blend.Zero;
    blendColor.ColorDestinationBlend = Blend.Zero;

    blendColor.AlphaSourceBlend = Blend.SourceAlpha;
    blendColor.ColorSourceBlend = Blend.SourceAlpha;

    SpriteBatch spriteBatch = new SpriteBatch(GraphicsDevice);
    spriteBatch.Begin(SpriteSortMode.Immediate, blendColor);
    spriteBatch.Draw(file, file.Bounds, Color.White);
    spriteBatch.End();

    //Now copy over the alpha values from the PNG source texture to the final one, without multiplying them
    BlendState blendAlpha = new BlendState();
    blendAlpha.ColorWriteChannels = ColorWriteChannels.Alpha;

    blendAlpha.AlphaDestinationBlend = Blend.Zero;
    blendAlpha.ColorDestinationBlend = Blend.Zero;

    blendAlpha.AlphaSourceBlend = Blend.One;
    blendAlpha.ColorSourceBlend = Blend.One;

    spriteBatch.Begin(SpriteSortMode.Immediate, blendAlpha);
    spriteBatch.Draw(file, file.Bounds, Color.White);
    spriteBatch.End();

    //Release the GPU back to drawing to the screen
    GraphicsDevice.SetRenderTarget(null);

    return result as Texture2D;
}

First, texture is loading from stream. Then, I change some blending options to reach behaviour such as in textures loaded by ContentPipeline. Unfortunately, textures obtained in this way, disapear after game window minimizing. I read something about this problem and a lot of things indicates that RenderTarget2D is fault because render target is set to null after all. What should I do to keep permanently my textures?

EDIT - Fixed code

OK, I used 4th option and it's work perfectly. Here's fixed code:

private Texture2D LoadTextureStream(string filePath)
{
    Texture2D file = null;
    Texture2D resultTexture;
    RenderTarget2D result = null;

    try
    {
        using (System.IO.Stream titleStream = TitleContainer.OpenStream(filePath))
        {
            file = Texture2D.FromStream(GraphicsDevice, titleStream);
        }
    }
    catch
    {
        throw new System.IO.FileLoadException("Cannot load '" + filePath + "' file!");
    }
    PresentationParameters pp = GraphicsDevice.PresentationParameters;
    //Setup a render target to hold our final texture which will have premulitplied alpha values
    result = new RenderTarget2D(GraphicsDevice, file.Width, file.Height, true, pp.BackBufferFormat, pp.DepthStencilFormat);

    GraphicsDevice.SetRenderTarget(result);
    GraphicsDevice.Clear(Color.Black);

    //Multiply each color by the source alpha, and write in just the color values into the final texture
    BlendState blendColor = new BlendState();
    blendColor.ColorWriteChannels = ColorWriteChannels.Red | ColorWriteChannels.Green | ColorWriteChannels.Blue;

    blendColor.AlphaDestinationBlend = Blend.Zero;
    blendColor.ColorDestinationBlend = Blend.Zero;

    blendColor.AlphaSourceBlend = Blend.SourceAlpha;
    blendColor.ColorSourceBlend = Blend.SourceAlpha;

    SpriteBatch spriteBatch = new SpriteBatch(GraphicsDevice);
    spriteBatch.Begin(SpriteSortMode.Immediate, blendColor);
    spriteBatch.Draw(file, file.Bounds, Color.White);
    spriteBatch.End();

    //Now copy over the alpha values from the PNG source texture to the final one, without multiplying them
    BlendState blendAlpha = new BlendState();
    blendAlpha.ColorWriteChannels = ColorWriteChannels.Alpha;

    blendAlpha.AlphaDestinationBlend = Blend.Zero;
    blendAlpha.ColorDestinationBlend = Blend.Zero;

    blendAlpha.AlphaSourceBlend = Blend.One;
    blendAlpha.ColorSourceBlend = Blend.One;

    spriteBatch.Begin(SpriteSortMode.Immediate, blendAlpha);
    spriteBatch.Draw(file, file.Bounds, Color.White);
    spriteBatch.End();

    //Release the GPU back to drawing to the screen
    GraphicsDevice.SetRenderTarget(null);

    resultTexture = new Texture2D(GraphicsDevice, result.Width, result.Height);
    Color[] data = new Color[result.Height * result.Width];
    Color[] textureColor = new Color[result.Height * result.Width];

    result.GetData<Color>(textureColor);

    for (int i = 0; i < result.Height; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < result.Width; j++)
        {
            data[j + i * result.Width] = textureColor[j + i * result.Width];
        }
    }

    resultTexture.SetData(data);

    return resultTexture;
}

Thanks a lot for help!

share|improve this question
    
It's worth pointing out that the code you've posted is actually more like option 3 in my answer. Except you're doing an unnecessary buffer copy on the CPU. You can get and set to the same buffer (ie: you could remove data and just SetData(textureColor). You could probably even set back to file and return that, saving yourself a texture. – Andrew Russell Nov 25 '12 at 21:48
    
For the sake of completeness - I've added an actual implementation of my answer's option 4 to the bottom of my answer. – Andrew Russell Nov 25 '12 at 21:59
    
Ok, I used your method PremultiplyTexture(Texture2D texture) instead of using RenderTarget2D. Now my code is clear and simple. Thank you :) – kemot90 Dec 20 '12 at 23:40
up vote 6 down vote accepted

This one is starting to drive me insane. I've answered this issue so many times. So I will try and make this one definitive.

This question keeps coming back because - first of all XNA is poorly documented - but also because people keep posting code like this in tutorials and forums and insisting that it's "ok" because it seems to work... until you minimise the window and all your textures go missing! Plus there's the misconception that - by doing the work on the GPU - it must be faster (it might not be).


Here's what's happening:

At the C#/CPU layer, a RenderTarget2D is a Texture2D. The as Texture2D at the end of your method there does precisely nothing. The cast you make could be implicit. The cast makes no changes to the referenced object instance. You could cast it back to a RenderTarget2D and, again, it wouldn't change the object itself.

The reason that RenderTarget2D inherits from Texture2D is so that you can pass a render target to any method that expects a texture and have it work correctly. But their underlying functionality has some important differences:

At the Direct3D/GPU layer, what is happening is that you are receiving a "Device Lost" error, due to the fact that the device context you were using went away (due to the window being minimised - but that is not the only thing that can cause it). This means that you lose all the GPU memory that you were using - including textures and render targets.

A regular Texture2D (that you load with ContentManager.Load or Texture2D.FromStream, or set up with SetData) maintains a CPU-side copy of the data. So when the device is lost, XNA will automatically re-create the contents of that texture from the CPU-side copy.

But a RenderTarget2D is kept entirely on the GPU. XNA has no way to recreate it if it goes missing. Getting a CPU-side copy of its contents would require an extremely expensive copy back from the GPU whenever you changed it.


Here's how you fix it:

  • Option 1 is to always re-render the contents of the render target at the start of each frame. This is the standard way to use render targets, as you usually have their contents change each frame anyway. Not really applicable to your case.

  • Option 2 is to respond to the RenderTarget2D.ContentLost event by re-creating the contents of the render target. (Alternately: check the IsContentLost flag each frame.)

  • Option 3 is to create a CPU-side copy of the texture. Basically get the data from the render target with GetData. Then create a new Texture2D and set the data onto it with SetData. XNA will then handle the any device loss for you (as described above).

  • Option 4 is to not use a render target at all! Use GetData to get your texture data, perform your transformation in software, and then set it back with SetData. Seeing as texture data is getting copied around anyway - why not do a copy yourself and premultiply it at the same time?

  • Option 5 is to replace FromStream with something that premultiplies as it loads. This is like option 4, but saves you a few copies. Probably overkill.

  • Option 6 is to store your textures in a pre-multiplied format in the first place. Although at this point you may as well be using the content pipeline.

Personally I would probably choose option 4 for your situation.


Finally: Don't forget to call Dispose on any resources (textures, render targets, etc) that you created yourself (with new or FromStream, but not from ContentManager) that you have finished using.

I notice that, in your code, you're leaking Texture2D file.


To save some insanity, I'll add to my answer a simple, untested method that premultiplies a texture entirely on the CPU:

public static void PremultiplyTexture(Texture2D texture)
{
    Color[] buffer = new Color[texture.Width * texture.Height];
    texture.GetData(buffer);
    for(int i = 0; i < buffer.Length; i++)
    {
        buffer[i] = Color.FromNonPremultiplied(
                buffer[i].R, buffer[i].G, buffer[i].B, buffer[i].A);
    }
    texture.SetData(buffer);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Any option that involves using Texture2D.SetData is not a good one on the XBox due to a memory leak bug in the API. connect.microsoft.com/site226/feedback/details/595882/… – Eric Cosky Feb 13 '13 at 7:31
    
If you're only using SetData at startup, then a memory leak in the API shouldn't really be an issue. – Andrew Russell Feb 20 '14 at 1:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.