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Imagine you have a generic interface that defines a generic value and a copy constructor like this (replacing ICloneable):

// T: type of value to hold, TU: type of the class itself
interface ICopyable<T,TU> where TU: ICopyable<T,TU> {
    T Value { get; set; }
    TU Copy();
}

This could be implemented by a boolean value holder like this:

class BooleanHolder : ICopyable<Boolean, BooleanHolder> {
    public BooleanHolder Copy() { 
        return new BooleanHolder(){ Value = Value }; 
    }
}

Now comes the question: How would you define a decorator class that holds another ICopyable? My not working idea was:

class DecoratingHolder<T,TU> : ICopyable<ICopyable<T,TU>, DecoratingHolder<T,TU>> {
    public DecoratingHolder<T,TU> Copy {
        // won't compile as Value is of type T and not of type ICopyable<T,TU> 
        // as I expected - why is that?
        return new DecoratingHolder<T,TU>(){ Value = Value.Copy };
    }
}

Note that I called Copy to also have the value of type ICopyable<T,TU> copied, this is on purpose to ensure deep copies.

So what do I have to change to make this structure work?

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2 Answers 2

You might just need to add a constraint. You define that ICopyable<T, TU> where TU : ICopyable<T, TU> but in your DecoratingHolder, you never explicitly constraint TU as such on DecoratingHolder.

More specifically, I think it's this part of the line:

class DecoratingHolder<T,TU> : ***ICopyable<ICopyable<T,TU>***

That's causing the issue. You're defining a ICopyable<T,TU> type, but TU has not been constrained to be ICopyable<T, TU>. (one might be able to infer that from the rest of the class declaration/inheritance, but the compiler doesn't) Once you add the constraint, then the compiler knows that Value is a compatible ICopyable<T,TU> type.

This compiles fine for me (had to fix some other minor things with the pseudocode you provided):

class DecoratingHolder<T,TU> : ICopyable<ICopyable<T,TU>, DecoratingHolder<T,TU>> 
    where TU : ICopyable<T,TU>
{
    public ICopyable<T,TU> Value { get; set; }

    public DecoratingHolder<T,TU> Copy() {
        return new DecoratingHolder<T, TU>(){ Value = Value };
    }
}

EDIT: In retrospect, do you even need that constraint on ICopyable? Seems to not do much as you already generically define the outgoing type anyway. Unless you have code elsewhere that depends on the fact that it returns ICopyable<T, TU> for some reason (it would inherently anyway as it would return a strongly typed TU or BooleanHolder or DecoratingHolder) then consider dumping it.

interface ICopyable<T,TU>
{
    T Value { get; set; }
    TU Copy();
}

class BooleanHolder : ICopyable<Boolean, BooleanHolder> 
{
    public bool Value { get; set; }
    public BooleanHolder Copy() { 
        return new BooleanHolder(){ Value = Value }; 
    }
}

class DecoratingHolder<T,TU> : ICopyable<ICopyable<T,TU>, DecoratingHolder<T,TU>> 
{
    public ICopyable<T,TU> Value { get; set; }

    public DecoratingHolder<T,TU> Copy() {
        return new DecoratingHolder<T, TU>(){ Value = Value };
    }
}

EDIT: From your comment requiring a deep copy, keep the constraints then (you'll need them), and invoke Copy on Value (sorry, I must have missed that detail)

class DecoratingHolder<T,TU> : ICopyable<ICopyable<T,TU>, DecoratingHolder<T,TU>> 
    where TU : ICopyable<T,TU>
{
    public ICopyable<T,TU> Value { get; set; }

    public DecoratingHolder<T,TU> Copy() {
        return new DecoratingHolder<T, TU>(){ Value = Value.Copy() };
    }
}

The Copy methods for any given class should then make sure they perform a deep copy. (I would suggest renaming Copy to DeepCopy if your framework needs them to be deep copy and you don't want implementations to do shallows accidentally)

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That's actually better than my approach, thanks. –  Serge Belov Nov 24 '12 at 14:14
    
@ChrisSinclair Ah, sorry I just noticed that I forget to mention the necessity of realizing deep copies. Would you adapt your answer –  Bastian Nov 24 '12 at 14:53
    
@Bastian Sorry, I glazed over that detail. I added another edit. –  Chris Sinclair Nov 24 '12 at 15:10
    
why is this not marked as the correct answer? –  qujck Jan 14 '13 at 9:36

A cast worked for me:

    public DecoratingHolder<T, TU> Copy()
    {
        return new DecoratingHolder<T, TU>() { Value = (ICopyable<T, TU>)Value.Copy() };
    }

I guess in this context the compiler doesn't go as far as to establish that TU and ICopyable<T, TU> is the same thing.

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