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I need your help with C/С++ arrays. I've been programming in Python for three years, and its array (which is called list) is pretty easy to work with.

>>> array = [1,2,3,4]
>>> array.append(5)
>>> array
[1,2,3,4,5]

As I've read in C/C++ I need to create a pointer to array. Could you, please, make a small sketch of class which contains array of char and has only one method append, which is called append and receives a char as a parameter. This method increases size of array by 1 and adds the given char to this array.

Someone may think that this is a homework, but I just can't understand the principle of how arrays, pointers and memory allocation work. I guess it's not hard, but it's hurd after languages like Python, because I didn't care about such things in Python. Could you, please, provide a small piece of code with explanations?

Thanks in advance!

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closed as not a real question by R. Martinho Fernandes, BЈовић, Mark, Ram kiran, Graviton Nov 28 '12 at 4:57

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Look up std::string for char arrays. cplusplus.com/reference/string/string –  Coding Mash Nov 24 '12 at 15:14
1  
"I guess it's not hard, but it's hard after languages like Python, because I didn't care about such things in Python." - And I'm being snubbed and being told that C is not good as a first programming language... –  user529758 Nov 24 '12 at 15:14
3  
Step one: stop talking about C/C++. There's no such thing. Either you're coding in C, or in C++. C++ has a lot of standard containers you can use. –  Mat Nov 24 '12 at 15:14
1  
@Mat: "Either you're coding in C, or in C++." -- That's not true. You can code in both at the same time. There are, in fact, many very popular libraries which are written with the specific intention of being able to compile both as C, and as C++. So, you can consider C/C++ as the intersection of the two languages. –  Benjamin Lindley Nov 24 '12 at 15:31
1  
@BenjaminLindley that doesn't mean that C and C++ are not two different (and not interchangeable) languages. –  user529758 Nov 24 '12 at 15:35

5 Answers 5

This is a standard C++ program:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    vector<int> array = {1, 2, 3, 4};
    array.push_back( 5 );

    for( auto const item : array )
    {
        cout << item << " ";
    }
    cout << endl;
}

Visual C++ specific.

Even the latest version of Microsoft’s Visual C++, namely the November 2012 CTP, which is version 11.0 with a bunch of fixes to support the C++11 standard, does not yet support the general initialization used above.

With Visual C++, as in C++03, that notation is only supported for so called aggregate types, which essentially are pure raw arrays or pure raw structs (which may contain more C++'ish types), or built-in types. So with Visual C++ one way to do this is to use that notation for a raw array, and then use that raw array to initialize the vector:

#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>     // std::begin, std:.end
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int const   data[]  = {1, 2, 3, 4};
    vector<int> array( begin( data ), end( data ) );
    array.push_back( 5 );

    for( auto const item : array )
    {
        cout << item << " ";
    }
    cout << endl;
}

And this compiles fine also with the base Visual C++ 11.0 as shipped with Visual Studio 2012.

However, the range based for loop will probably not compile with Visual C++ 10.0 (corresponding to Visual Studio 2010).

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1  
List initializers for vectors are only for C++11 –  Sebastian Cabot Nov 24 '12 at 15:24
1  
@SebastianCabot ...and so is auto, and range-based loops. Still standard, though. :-) –  HostileFork Nov 24 '12 at 15:27
2  
@SebastianCabot: C++11 is the current C++ standard. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 24 '12 at 15:27
    
@HostileFork and author: I'm well aware this is the latest standard as you two are well aware that there is no single compiler out there that implements it in full. GCC comes close but even GCC still doesn't implement it all. And I see you have edited your answer. Good - now I can upvote it. Although you are making his life easy. It's really bad advise to go with vector when you don't know how a regular array works. –  Sebastian Cabot Nov 24 '12 at 15:31
3  
You're not a real C++ programmer until you write the compiler yourself, using only the letter 'o'. search.dilbert.com/comic/We%20Didn't%20Have%20Zeros –  HostileFork Nov 24 '12 at 15:49

C and C++ are different languages.

In modern C++, you often don't use raw arrays, but e.g. std::vector which provides you with the push_back member function.

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an array cannot change size. You can however use a list in C++

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/list/list/

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3  
Lists do not use contiguous memory. While other languages may implement "arrays" with linked list or otherwise under the hood, std::vector is the more natural C++ go-to class for "arrays" that can grow/shrink and you can also access them as if they were C arrays. –  HostileFork Nov 24 '12 at 15:19

In C++ one typically never uses raw (C-style) arrays, but instead containers like std::vector (dynamic size) or std::array (fixed size, in C++11). With these implementing your array class is straight-forward (you didn't specify a way to access the elements though, so pretty unusable).

class array {
    std::vector<char> v_;
  public:
    void append(char c) {
      v_.push_back(c);
    }
};
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The term array both in C and in C++ is used to denote a contiguous block of memory containing one or more data elements of the same type.

There are two types of arrays: static arrays and dynamic arrays. static arrays are allocated in the memory when the program is compiled and stored in the data segment of your program. Dynamic arrays as their name implies are allocated in runtime from the heap (the data structure used to access the memory available to the program for dynamic allocation).

Both array types are accessed the same way using pointers and indexers (the [] operator).

Both in C and C++ a pointer is a variable that point to a place in memory. The memory it points to may contain a class or a primitive data type.

There are however differences between a static arrays and a dynamic arrays. Here are the important ones:

  1. dynamic arrays must be allocated to use them and freed to prevent memory leaks
  2. static arrays cannot be resized

In C you allocate memory using malloc and release it using free. You can resize it using realloc

In C++ you allocate memory using new and release it using delete. You have to write your own code to resize it.

For most purposes a dynamic array in C++ will be implemented using std::vector. In C if you want such a mechanism you will have to roll your own. You got a good answer from @Cheers and hth. - Alf on std::vector.

I don't think this is the place to write a full tutorial on dynamic memory in C or C++. You can get a good introduction from http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/dynamic/

Here is however a sample code that will show you how to do what you want in C. For C++ use std::vector.

/*
C CODE
*/

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <limits.h>

typedef struct DARRAY dynamic_int_array_t;

typedef struct DARRAY
{
    int length;
    int *data;
    void (*alloc)(dynamic_int_array_t * the_array, int length);/*allocate*/
    void (*free)(dynamic_int_array_t * the_array);/*free*/
    void (*resize)(dynamic_int_array_t * the_array, int new_length);/*resize*/
    void (*append)(dynamic_int_array_t * the_array, int new_value);
    int (*get_at)(dynamic_int_array_t * the_array, int pos);/*use 1 based index getter*/
    void (*set_at)(dynamic_int_array_t * the_array, int pos, int value);/*use 1 based index setter*/
}dynamic_int_array_t;

void allocIntArray(dynamic_int_array_t * the_array, int length)
{
    /*
    Allocate memory to contain length number of integers
    */
    the_array->data = (int*)malloc(length*sizeof(int));
    the_array->length = length;
}

void freeIntArray(dynamic_int_array_t * the_array)
{
    if(NULL != the_array->data)
        free(the_array->data);/*Free the memory*/
    the_array->length = 0;/*Reset the length of the array*/
}

void resizeIntArray(dynamic_int_array_t * the_array, int new_length)
{
    if(NULL != the_array->data && the_array->length > 0 && new_length >= 0)
    {

        if(new_length == 0)/*Free the array if a value of 0 was requested*/
            the_array->free(the_array);
        else
        {
            /*Resize the memory block*/
            the_array->data = (int*)realloc(the_array->data, new_length*sizeof(int));
        }
        the_array->length = new_length;
    }
}

void appendIntArray(dynamic_int_array_t * the_array, int new_value)
{   
    the_array->resize(the_array, the_array->length + 1);
    the_array->data[the_array->length - 1] = new_value;
}

int getAt(dynamic_int_array_t * the_array, int pos)
{
    if(NULL != the_array->data && pos > 0 && pos <= the_array->length)
        return the_array->data[pos-1];
    return INT_MIN;/*use INT_MIN to indicate error*/
}

void setAt(dynamic_int_array_t * the_array, int pos, int value)
{
    if(NULL != the_array->data && pos > 0 && pos <= the_array->length)
        the_array->data[pos-1] = value;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    dynamic_int_array_t int_array = 
    {
        0,
        NULL,
        allocIntArray,
        freeIntArray,
        resizeIntArray,
        appendIntArray,
        getAt,
        setAt       
    };

    int_array.alloc(&int_array, 4);
    int_array.data[0] = 1, int_array.data[1] = 2,
        int_array.data[2] = 3, int_array.data[3] = 4;
    printf("array length: %d, last member: %d\n", int_array.length, int_array.get_at(&int_array,4));
    int_array.resize(&int_array, 5);
    int_array.data[4] = 5;/* can also use int_array.set_at(&int_array,5) = 5; */
    printf("array length: %d, last member: %d\n", int_array.length, int_array.get_at(&int_array,5));
    int_array.append(&int_array, 6);
    printf("array length: %d, last member: %d\n", int_array.length, int_array.get_at(&int_array,5));
}
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