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i'm reading bash examples about if but some examples are write with single square brackets:

if [ -f $param ]
then
  #...
fi

others with double square brackets

if [[ $? -ne 0 ]]
then
    start looking for errors in yourlog
fi

what is difference?

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1  
You can get your answer by looking at answer of this question: unix.stackexchange.com/questions/3831/… –  Amir Naghizadeh Nov 24 '12 at 16:01
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4 Answers

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Single [] are posix shell compliant condition tests.

Double [[]] are an extension to the standard [] and are supported by bash and other shells (e.g. zsh, ksh). They support extra operations (as well as the standard posix operations). For example: || instead of -o and regex matching with =~. A fuller list of differences can be found in the bash manual section on conditional constructs.

Use [] whenever you want your script to be portable across shells. Use [[]] if you want conditional expressions not supported by [] and don't need to be portable.

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[[ is a bash keyword similar to (but more powerful than) the [ command. See http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/031 and http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashGuide/TestsAndConditionals

Unless you're writing for POSIX sh, we recommend [[

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Inside single brackets for condition test (i.e. [ ... ]), some operators such as single = is supported by all shells, whereas use of operator == is not supported by some of the older shells.

Inside double brackets for condition test (i.e. [[ ... ]]), there is no difference between using = or == in old or new shells.

Edit: I should also note that: In bash, always use double brackets [[ ... ]] if possible, because it is safer than single brackets. I'll illustrate why with the following example:

if [ $var == "hello" ]; then

if $var happens to be null / empty, then this is what the script sees:

if [ == "hello" ]; then

which will break your script. The solution is to either use double brackets, or always remember to put quotes around your variables ("$var"). Double brackets is better defensive coding practice.

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you can use the double square brackets for light regex matching, e.g. :

if [[ $1 =~ "foo.*bar" ]] ; then

(as long as the version of bash you are using supports this syntax)

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Except you've quoted the pattern, so it's now treated as a literal string. –  ormaaj Nov 24 '12 at 18:05
    
very true. sometimes this annoys me :) –  asf107 Nov 27 '12 at 18:36
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