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I have this structure in my project.
EmployeeController layer invokes EmployeeApi layer that invokes EmployeeBusinessLogic (bll) Layer.

the controller works with EmployeeModel and the bll works with EmployeeEntity (nhibernate).
the API layer converts the model from Model to entity and give to bll.
The validation works on the controller (MVC), and get to the BLL already validated.
Do I need to validate the entity again on the bll? because if someone develops and re-use my bll, he might send un-validated data to it. Should I Validate the data twice? on the BLL and on the Controller?
for me it looks like a duplicity since the Model is 80% similar to the entity.
what is the workaround here? Thanks

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would always validate on the BLL, since it is the core of your system. As your system will be exposed through services that may end up outside of your control or used by applications with different needs, it is a way to make sure that your data will be valid no matter where it comes from.

For example, think about this example:

MVC Application | internal cmd tool | 3rd party application

Service layer

Business layer

You start by creating an MVC application on top of your core business and service layers. Then someone thinks it will be a good idea to create an internal command line tool that can perform some operations over your application core. If you were not validating on your business layer, then you will need to repeat the validations done by the MVC application. You could live with that, but consumers of your service layer may be even out of your control if you expose your services to 3rd parties. So in the end the only way to fully trust your data is by validating in the business layer before persisting it.

Also depending on the application it is also useful to add validations on some other layers like controller or client validations on an ASP MVC application. That way the operation fails as early as possible and users are notified of errors as soon as possible.

For example in an MVC application, simple validations will work on the client side using jquery validation and MVC unobtrusive validation, so when errors are found it doesnt even need to send data back to the server and wait for the response. You also have another validation step at the controller actions, where your view models will be validated. If any error is found on the controller, it will be added to the ModelState and users are typically redirected to a screen where errors are displayed and an action can be taken. Finally your application core will validate the data that gets in and any errors found will be send back up in the stack.

As you said then it seems you will repeat tons of validation code, but there are ways to minimise this impact. As you are working with ASP MVC an example could be mixing Data Annotations and your library of validations:

  • You could use data annotations on your models and business objects for the most simple validations like requireds or regular expressions. You can also develop your own data annotations validation attributes.

    public class EmployeeModel
    {
        [Required]
        public string Name {get; set;}
        ...
    }
    
    public class EmployeeEntity: BaseEntity
    {
        [Required]
        public string Name {get; set;}
        ...
    }
    
  • For your business layer, create a base validator that only takes into account the data annotations attributes. (Something similar to the approach described here: http://odetocode.com/blogs/scott/archive/2011/06/29/manual-validation-with-data-annotations.aspx)

    public class BaseValidator<T> where T: BaseEntity
    {
        public virtual ValidationResult Validate(T entity)
        {
             ... validate data annotations here ...
        }
    }
    
  • This will give you the same set of basic rules on client side, controller and business layer, mostly related with user input.

  • For any entity with more complex validation logic derive a specific validator on your business layer from the one that only takes into account data annotation attributes. Add there specific and more complex validation logic for that entity type.

    public class EmployeeValidator: BaseValidator<EmployeeEntity>
    {
        public override ValidationResult Validate(EmployeeEntity entity)
        {
             base.Validate(entity);
    
             ... perform complex BLL calculations ...
        }
    }
    
  • Finally, add some code in your controller layer that adds any validation errors raised from your business layer into the ModelState. For example you could add a method like this on a base controller class:

    public void AddValidationsToModelState(ValidationResult validationResult)
    {
        foreach(var error in validationResult.Errors)
        {
            ModelState.AddModelError(error.property, error.message);
        }
    }
    

In the end you will end up with a common shared library of data annotations attributes and specific validation procedures part of your business layer. Hope it helps!

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Thanks, can you please explain in more detail the part 1? thanks – SexyMF Nov 24 '12 at 18:43
    
I have added some more detail in general – Daniel J.G. Nov 26 '12 at 22:20

Personally, I would never trust data that crosses a service boundary. If your business logic layer is designed to be shared then you should validate again. Yes, it is duplication, but I don't really see any alternatives here.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, how would you validate the BLL? how would you pass the validation result to the client? I dont want to loose the Razor capabilities with the validation data. – SexyMF Nov 24 '12 at 18:48
    
Think of it as layers of validation. At the controller you would take advantage of the standard MVC validation framework using attributes like [Required]. In lower layers, you will need a way to run these validators again. Reporting from these layers to your MVC controllers should probably happen through exceptions and then your controller would report it to the client using ModelState.AddModelError. – Ragesh Nov 24 '12 at 19:12

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