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I get following strings from a server, only separated by spaces. (Line breaks are just due to readability, "XX is a placeholder and can vary in length. also the length of the things in square brackets can vary in length.

String 1:

status:ok [XXX][a=XXX b=XXX c=XXX d=XXX e=0 f=XXX g=XXX h=XXX i=XXX j=XXX 
k=XXX l=XXX m=XXX n=[[XXX][XXX]] p=[[XXX][XXX][XXX][XXX][XXX][XXX][XXX]]]
end:end

String 2:

status:ok [XXX][a=XXX b=XXX  c=XXX d=XXX d2=XXX e=XXX  f=XXX g=XXX h=XXX i=XXX j=XXX 
k=XXX l=XXX m=XXX n=[[XXX][XXX]] p=[[XXX][XXX][XXX][XXX][XXX][XXX][XXX]]]
end:end

All parts in square brackets "[]" can contain more or less of "[]"-elements and words inside a inner "[]" can vary in length. I need those a,b,c,d,e etc. in a HashMap, but before i can do that i need to parse it somehow.

How can i parse this string efficiently in Java?

I have searched and found lots of websites and threads where people suggested something called "key value parsing" apart from "Regex parsing", but unfortunately information on "key value parsing" is sparse.

EDIT: In the end I want to store those values in a Hashmap like this:

HashMap<String,Object> myHashMap = new HashMap();
myHashMap.put(a, XXX);
....
myHashMap.put(p,array-of-all-[XXX]);
share|improve this question
    
i need to parse it somehow. -> How exactly is that somehow? –  Rohit Jain Nov 24 '12 at 16:41
    
with "All parts in square brackets "[]" can contain more or less of "[]"-elements" you mean that anything within square brackets is optional? –  holgero Nov 24 '12 at 16:48
    
Did you need that n, and p, too, or only the a - m in your example (m and p are nested) –  AlexWien Nov 24 '12 at 16:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could simply do this and it will print your a,b,c ..

  String s ="status:ok [XXX][a=XXX b=XXX c=XXX d=XXX e=0 f=XXX g=XXX h=XXX i=XXX j=XXX k=XXX l=XXX m=XXX n=[[XXX][XXX]] p=[[XXX][XXX][XXX][XXX][XXX][XXX][XXX]]] end:end".replaceAll("end:end", "");

    String [] ss  = s.split("=");
    HashMap<Character,Object> myHashMap = new HashMap();
    try{
    for(int i=0;i<ss.length;i++){

        myHashMap.put(ss[i].charAt(ss[i].length()-1), ss[i+1].substring(0, ss[i+1].length()-1).trim());

    }

    }catch(Exception e){
        // do nothing
    }
      System.out.println(myHashMap);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
does not work for n and p, where he wants an array of XXX instead of an string –  AlexWien Nov 24 '12 at 16:56
    
I change it with hashMap and its worked fine –  abc123 Nov 24 '12 at 17:05
    
Sura, OK, I see –  AlexWien Nov 24 '12 at 17:06
    
i have to parse those arrays separately, but it does work –  kiltek Nov 25 '12 at 20:04

Will this help

String str = "status:ok [XXX][a=XXX b=XXX c=XXX d=XXX e=0 f=XXX g=XXX h=XXX i=XXX j=XXX k=XXX l=XXX m=XXX n=[[XXX][XXX]] p=[[XXX][XXX][XXX][XXX][XXX][XXX][XXX]]] end:end";
String[] splitStrA = str.split(" ");         
HashMap<String,String> map = new HashMap() ;
for (String splitStr : splitStrA) {
    String[] splitStr1 = splitStr.split("=");
    if (splitStr1.length == 2) {
        map.put(splitStr1[0], splitStr1[1]);
    }
}
System.out.println(map);
share|improve this answer
    
does not work for n and p, where he wants an array instead of an string –  AlexWien Nov 24 '12 at 16:56

Instead of using regular expressions, how about using a classic string tokenizer?

These days, everybody tries to smash everything with regexps. That made a lot of sense in Perl, as regexp were a very shorthand syntax there. But for Java, regexps are a bit clumsy.

However, Java brings along a number of useful classes, for example StringTokenizer. Some people consider it discouraged, but in many situations it is very useful.

And of course there are various packages that help with parsing file formats.

CUP for example is a parser generator used by the Weka machine learning toolkit.

JFlex is likely inspired by the classic C "flex" parser generator (and Yacc, Bison etc.)

A good parser will be able to e.g. parse nested expressions. It will know how to interpret expressions such as a=[[1,2],[3,4]] even when they are nested deeply. Regular expressions cannot do that.

There is nothing wrong with regular expressions. But they are designed for matching, not such much for parsing.

share|improve this answer

Its not Regex-Parsing, but a bit of key value parsing, but mainly it is general parsing.
You should study that topic.

The problem in your String is that an expression [] can contain other expressions (nested [[]]).
This is nothing which can be solved in 3 lines.
Try to search for explanation how to parse expression.
Further you need to understand what a "Grammar" is. Then write down the grammar of that expression in the string,
then half of the work is done, because you can implement the parse more or less strictly following the grammar.

Another solution: use one of the answers above that does not work for n and p (arrays). And in an second step you parse the expresssion [[XXX][XXX][XXX][XXX][XXX][XXX]], which is not so diffult; (you can use String.split("]") and go back in the string till you find the "[").

share|improve this answer
    
sura's solution does not work for arrays ? –  kiltek Nov 25 '12 at 11:35
    
After she or he has changed the code, itvworks. –  AlexWien Nov 25 '12 at 12:26

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