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The code below prints garbage values when I run it in ubuntu terminal by ./a.out abc abd

#include<stdio.h>

int main(int size_of_args, char args[10][10])
{
    while(size_of_args)
        printf("%s\n",args[--size_of_args]);

    return 0;
}

But the code below runs correctly please explain.

#include<stdio.h>

int main(int size_of_args, char *args[])
{
    while(size_of_args)
        printf("%s\n",args[--size_of_args]);

    return 0;
}
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closed as too localized by Brian Roach, Vlad Lazarenko, Ash Burlaczenko, Jens Gustedt, Mario Nov 24 '12 at 19:30

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5  
Please read a good book about programming in C, it is explaining much better than we can explain in a few minutes. –  Basile Starynkevitch Nov 24 '12 at 16:43
    
And turn on your compiler's warnings; it'll tell you there's something fishy with your first snippet. –  Mat Nov 24 '12 at 16:45
    
why using a fixed table [10][10] ? this table size can vary, so why not using *args[] or **args ? –  Paschalis Nov 24 '12 at 16:48
    
Your first main() is not a legitimate way of declaring main() on any system I've ever heard of or expect to hear of. ISO/IEC 9899:2011 §5.1.2.2.1 Program startup. ¶1 The function called at program startup is named main. The implementation declares no prototype for this function. It shall be defined with a return type of int and with no parameters: int main(void) { /* ... */ } or with two parameters (...): int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { /* ... */ } or equivalent; or in some other implementation-defined manner. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 24 '12 at 16:55
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1 Answer

Because char args[10][10] is a array of 10x10 characters, while char *args[] is a pointer to (array of) pointers to (array of) chars. The latter is how parameters are passed to main.

A reasonable compiler would warn you in the first case that you have wrong signature for main.

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