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Why do these swap functions behave differently?

Have a look at the code below, aimed to swap two numbers, but it does not. Please help me to understand the reason why it does not. I am new to programming, so I would be grateful if you explain the things more than usual. Thank you!

#include <stdio.h>
void swap (int a, int b);
int main (void)
{
   int x = 1;
   int y = 2;
   swap (x, y);
   printf ("Now x is %d and y is %d\n", x, y);

   return 0;

}
//function definition of swap
void swap (int a, int b)
{
   int temp = a;
   int a = b;
   int b = temp;
}
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marked as duplicate by H2CO3, DCoder, Jens Gustedt, Basile Starynkevitch, Mat Nov 24 '12 at 16:49

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

7  
Please read a good book about C programming because we cannot teach you C in a few minutes. Short answer: swap should take pointer arguments, and you should call it as swap(&x, &y) –  Basile Starynkevitch Nov 24 '12 at 16:46
    
Please read a comprehensive C language tutorial/reference. This is way too basic to be asked on StackOverflow. –  user529758 Nov 24 '12 at 16:46
2  
@H2CO3: there is no rule saying that basic question should not be asked. Actually, they probably should be. –  nico Nov 24 '12 at 16:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

C is pass-by-value, so the swap function receives copies of the values, and cannot affect the variables in the caller.

To affect the variables in the caller, you need to pass pointers to them.

void swap(int *a, int *b) {
    int temp = *a;
    *a = *b;
    *b = temp;
}

and call it

swap(&x, &y);

in main.

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why calling swap(x,y) also works in c++ compilers ? I am using codeblocks 13. –  Lucky yesterday
1  
Not sure which swap you mean. For the one in the answer, C++ has pointers too, with the same syntax as C, so it's normal. C++ also has std::swap, which takes references, so if you call swap(x,y) with a using namespace std; declaration before it, you call std::swap if you have no declaration void swap(int a, int b); before the call. But without the exact code, I can only guess which situation you have. –  Daniel Fischer yesterday
    
Thank you Daniel Fischer. your comment did help me. I was using using namespace std; and also had a swap(int * a, int * b) definition of mine. Apparently I was calling the std::swap and was expecting my own definition of swap to be called. –  Lucky yesterday

This is because you pass variables by copy and not by pointer. In other words, your swap() functions receives its own private copies of x and y and swap them and the result of swap is not visible by the caller. The correct code might look something like this:

#include <stdio.h>

void swap(int *a, int *b);

int main(void)
{
    int x = 1;
    int y = 2;
    swap(&x, &y);
    printf("Now x is %d and y is %d\n", x, y);
    return 0;
}

//function definition of swap
void swap(int *a, int *b)
{
    int temp = *a;
    *a = *b;
    *b = temp;
}
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