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There are a group of private methods in my class, and I need to call one dynamically based on an input value. Both the invoking code and the target methods are in the same instance. The code looks like this:

MethodInfo dynMethod = this.GetType().GetMethod("Draw_" + itemType);
dynMethod.Invoke(this, new object[] { methodParams });

In this case, GetMethod() will not return private methods. What BindingFlags do I need to supply to GetMethod() so that it can locate private methods?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 221 down vote accepted

Simply change your code to use the overloaded version of GetMethod that accepts BindingFlags:

MethodInfo dynMethod = this.GetType().GetMethod("Draw_" + itemType, 
    BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance);
dynMethod.Invoke(this, new object[] { methodParams });

Here's the BindingFlags enumeration documentation.

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89  
I am going to get myself into so much trouble with this. –  Frank Schwieterman Mar 10 '09 at 18:10
1  
@FrankSchwieterman FTFY –  cod3monk3y Aug 20 at 22:28
    
BindingFlags.NonPublic not returning private method.. :( –  Moumit Mondal Oct 22 at 10:25
    
@MoumitMondal are your methods static? You have to specify BindingFlags.Instance as well as BindingFlags.NonPublic for non-static methods. –  BrianS 10 hours ago

BindingFlags.NonPublic will not return any results by itself. As it turns out, combining it with BindingFlags.Instance does the trick.

MethodInfo dynMethod = this.GetType().GetMethod("Draw_" + itemType, 
    BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance);
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Are you absolutely sure this can't be done through inheritance? Reflection is the very last thing you should look at when solving a problem, it makes refactoring, understanding your code, and any automated analysis more difficult.

It looks like you should just have a DrawItem1, DrawItem2, etc class that override your dynMethod.

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1  
@Bill K: Given other circumstances, we decided not to use inheritance for this, hence the use of reflection. For most cases, we would do it that way. –  Jeromy Irvine Sep 25 '08 at 19:32

And if you really want to get yourself in trouble, make it easier to execute by writing an extension method:

static class AccessExtensions
{
    public static object call(this object o, string methodName, params object[] args)
    {
        var mi = o.GetType ().GetMethod (methodName, System.Reflection.BindingFlags.NonPublic | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Instance );
        if (mi != null) {
            return mi.Invoke (o, args);
        }
        return null;
    }
}

And usage:

    class Counter
    {
        public int count { get; private set; }
        void incr(int value) { count += value; }
    }

    [Test]
    public void making_questionable_life_choices()
    {
        Counter c = new Counter ();
        c.call ("incr", 2);             // "incr" is private !
        c.call ("incr", 3);
        Assert.AreEqual (5, c.count);
    }
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1  
Dangerous? Yes. But a great helper extension when wrapped in my unit testing namespace. Thanks for this. –  Robert Wahler Aug 29 at 13:38

BindingFlags.NonPublic

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7  
It does not work with NonPublic by itself... –  Luis Filipe Apr 27 '10 at 9:22

Could you not just have a different Draw method for each type that you want to Draw? Then call the overloaded Draw method passing in the object of type itemType to be drawn.

Your question does not make it clear whether itemType genuinely refers to objects of differing types.

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I think you can pass it BindingFlags.NonPublic where it is the GetMethod method.

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typeof( itemType )
.GetMethod( "Draw_" , BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance )
.Invoke(new itemType(),null );
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