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I have a big array which contains all kind of types (booleans, arrays, null, ...), and I am trying to access their propiety arr[i].length, but some of them obiously fail to have length.

I wouldn't mind if the guys missing length returned undefined (I could simply use arr[i].length||0 or something like that), but this is not the case, the whole thing crashes with some values (null or undefined for example).

var i, len, arr;

arr = [true, ["elm_0"], 99, "abc"]; //crashes if you add 'null' or 'undefined'

for(i = 0, len = arr.length ; i<len ; i++){
    document.write(arr[i].length + "<br>");
}

document.write("I was executed");
  • What other vars will crash besides null and undefined?
  • How to prevent this from happening?
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stackoverflow.com/questions/4690520/… - this answers your exact question –  Scott Selby Nov 24 '12 at 18:49
    
Yes, that is because undefined does not have any properties. –  Asad Nov 24 '12 at 18:49
    
@PaulS.: The OP is suggesting that adding the values null or undefined to arr will result in a crash when taking arr[i].length; If I'm not mistaken, if(arr) will still return true in this scenario, and the loop still executed. –  username tbd Nov 24 '12 at 18:52
    
@usernametbd I was typing in the wrong place –  Paul S. Nov 24 '12 at 19:04
    
@ScottSelby I belive it doesn't –  ajax333221 Nov 24 '12 at 19:04
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Check for arr[i] before arr[i].length

var i, len, arr;

arr = [true, ["elm_0"], 99, "abc"];

if(arr) for(i = 0, len = arr.length || 0 ; i<len ; i++){
    if(arr[i]) document.write((arr[i].length || 0) + "<br>");
    else document.write(0 + "<br>"); // what to do if no arr[i]
}

document.write("I was executed");

You can use a ternary operator, too (arr[i]?arr[i].length||0:0)

share|improve this answer
    
I am sure my arr will always be an arr, the first len=...||0 is not really necessary, but I am definetely using the arr[i]?arr[i].length||0:0 line –  ajax333221 Nov 24 '12 at 19:39
    
Note: This will skip some values that actually have a length property, like "". –  Guffa Nov 24 '12 at 20:37
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You're going to get a TypeError stating undefined has no properties. Nothing you can do here but wrap it in a try catch for TypeErrors.

Note that this is the same reason referencing a property on something that evaluates to undefined will return a ReferenceError: undefined should never have properties.

share|improve this answer
    
there seem to be other ways to prevent this without catching anything, your 'nothing you can do... except catch' will start to look incorrect-er every time someone post a working answer D: –  ajax333221 Nov 24 '12 at 19:13
    
@ajax333221 You're taking that a bit too literally. What I mean is that there is no way to prevent an error from popping up when you try to evaluate a property on undefined or null. The other answers are just ways of avoiding that evaluation (checking for null undefined and skipping the iteration etc.). –  Asad Nov 24 '12 at 19:15
    
you are right, but well you can't denny at first glance it looks like you are saying there is not other possible work around except catching, my confusion is understandable –  ajax333221 Nov 24 '12 at 19:21
    
@ajax333221 I apologise sincerely. –  Asad Nov 24 '12 at 19:24
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You can just check for null without doing a type specific check, that will catch undefined values also.

var i, len, arr;
arr = [true, ["elm_0"], 99, "abc", null, undefined];
for (i = 0, len = arr.length; i < len; i++) {
    if (arr[i] != null) {
        console.log(arr[i].length);
    }
}
console.log("I was executed");
share|improve this answer
    
@Asad: Yes, I already found that out, and adjusted the answer. :) –  Guffa Nov 24 '12 at 18:56
    
something like that will work, since you are using a weak check I think there wont be much difference if I use if(arr[i]) or something like that, which is basically what Paul S. did so I gave him a +1 too –  ajax333221 Nov 24 '12 at 19:21
    
@ajax333221: Yes, you will get the same result for most values, but for example the value "" will be evaluated to false eventhough it is an object, and actually has a length property. –  Guffa Nov 24 '12 at 19:29
    
those will go to the else and I think giving falsey values 0 len is safe, I wrote (arr[i])?arr[i].length||0:0 which is exactly what Paul said, I am starting to like his answer more, and you have plenty rep, and I should not feel sorry, changing accepted answer is not wrong please respect my opinion I have this power and help please dont be mad, trust me I feel worse than you –  ajax333221 Nov 24 '12 at 19:35
    
@ajax333221: NP. That solution works too, as long as you are aware of the difference, and it doesn't cause a problem in your situation. –  Guffa Nov 24 '12 at 20:39
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Try this:

var i, len, arr;

arr = [true, ["elm_0"], 99, "abc"]; //crashes if you add 'null' or 'undefined'

for(i = 0, len = arr.length ; i<len ; i++){

try{
console.log(arr[i].length);
}Catch(e){console.log(0);}
}

console.log("I was executed");
share|improve this answer
add comment

If your only goal is to determine if one of these objects is an array, then instead of:

for(i = 0, len = arr.length ; i<len ; i++){
    console.log(arr[i].length);
}

You should try this:

for(i = 0, len = arr.length ; i<len ; i++){
    if (arr[i] instanceof Array)
        console.log(arr[i].length);
}
share|improve this answer
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