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I am kinda new to mysql so i am stuck on a query. I have that table from a db called songs (i can only read in this db):

table name:cd_production

code_cd  etaireia  etos
______________________
400400  ODEON     1987
400401  ODEON     1986
400412  COLUMBIA  1990
400420  COLUMBIA  1990
400657  LYRA      1965
410000  COLUMBIA  1962
410001  COLUMBIA  1964
410003  PHILIPS   1979
410005  PHILIPS   1971
420430  ODEON     2002
420440  LYRA      2005
420450  COLUMBIA  2009
420460  ODEON     2007
420470  PHILIPS   2008
420480  ODEON     2002
420490  COLUMBIA  2010
500500  SONY      1968
500510  SONY      1972
600601  COLUMBIA  1962
600602  COLUMBIA  1963
600603  ODEON     1964
670670  PHILIPS   1983

and i want to find the etaireia with the maximum number of cds produced (meaning different code_cd for each etaireia). I ask

select etaireia ,count(all code_cd) as cds
from cd_production
group by etaireia

and i get the list with a returned column

etaireia  cds
________________    
COLUMBIA   8
LYRA       2
ODEON      6
PHILIPS    4
SONY       2

which is kinda correct but i dont know how to get only the etaireia with maximum cds like

    etaireia  cds
    ________________    
    COLUMBIA   8

Whats the trick here? I dont want to use the LIMIT 1 method cause its not generic. Thanks in advance

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If you have multiple rows with the same max count, you want to retrieve all of them? –  Michael Berkowski Nov 24 '12 at 19:31
    
@MichaelBerkowski Yes i would like that :) –  Geo Papas Nov 24 '12 at 19:40
    
Ok, I updated my answer. –  Michael Berkowski Nov 24 '12 at 19:54
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Other "generic" ways, that should run in most DBMS (and do not use the MYSQL specific LIMIT keyword):

SELECT 
    etaireia,
    COUNT(*) AS cds
FROM
    cd_production c
GROUP BY 
    etaireia
HAVING 
    COUNT(*) >= ALL 
        ( SELECT COUNT(*) 
          FROM cd_production cc
          GROUP BY cc.etaireia
        ) ; 

and this:

SELECT 
    etaireia,
    COUNT(*) AS cds
FROM
    cd_production  c
GROUP BY 
    etaireia
HAVING 
    NOT EXISTS
        ( SELECT * 
          FROM cd_production  cc
          GROUP BY cc.etaireia
          HAVING COUNT(*) > COUNT(DISTINCT c.code_cd)
        ) ; 

Both tested in SQL-Fiddle: test-1 (works in all 4: Postgres, SQL-Server, Oracle, MySQL except the 2nd query which doesn't run in Postgres).


For those DBMS that have window functions (and the OVER clause), there is also another way (works in Postgres, Oracle, SQL-Server 2012):

SELECT etaireia, cds
FROM
  ( SELECT 
        etaireia, cds,
        RANK() OVER (ORDER BY cds DESC) AS rnk
    FROM
      ( SELECT 
            etaireia,
            COUNT(*) AS cds 
        FROM
            cd_production  c
        GROUP BY 
            etaireia
      ) tmp
  ) tmp2
WHERE rnk = 1 ;

And what would be the "standard" way is the following. It should work in Postgres and SQL-Server that support the standard SQL syntax FETCH ... OFFSET (equivalent to vendor specific LIMIT and TOP) :

SELECT 
    etaireia,
    COUNT(*) AS cds
FROM
    cd_production AS c
GROUP BY 
    etaireia
ORDER BY
    cds DESC
OFFSET 0 ROWS
FETCH FIRST 1 ROWS ONLY ;

Both tested in SQL-Fiddle: test-3 (Q4 works in Postgres and SQL-Server 2012). Note that this one will give different results than the 3 first queries because the FETCH syntax does not resolve ties, returns only one row from the tied ones.

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If you wish to find all records and their count which have the greatest count, you can use a subquery in the HAVING clause to determine what the MAX() value is for the COUNT().

SELECT 
  etaireia,
  COUNT(*) AS cds
FROM
  cd_production
GROUP BY etaireia
HAVING cds = (
   SELECT MAX(cds) 
   FROM (SELECT etaireia, COUNT(*) as cds
         FROM cd_production 
         GROUP BY etaireia) subq
   )

http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/869b4/4

The method for limiting to a single row varies between RDBMS. MySQL uses LIMIT, MSSQL uses TOP, Oracle uses ROWNUM... Using the RDBMS-specific method makes this a lot simpler, because you do not need to nest subqueries in the HAVING clause. Instead you could use LIMIT in the HAVING subquery to return only the one greatest COUNT() without needing to wrap another query to get MAX().

SELECT 
  etaireia,
  COUNT(*) AS cds
FROM
  cd_production
GROUP BY etaireia
HAVING cds = (
   SELECT COUNT(*)
   FROM cd_production 
   GROUP BY etaireia
   ORDER BY COUNT(*) DESC 
   LIMIT 1
)

and here is the MySQL-specific version...

share|improve this answer
1  
excuse me i have noted that i dont want to use the limit 1 method cause its wrong. What if multiple raws have the same max value? it wouldnt work. –  Geo Papas Nov 24 '12 at 19:31
    
Break ties on the name. it makes for a complicated query though. –  Bohemian Nov 24 '12 at 20:00
    
@michael berkowski i dont get it. it doesnt work. The query supposes that the cds already exist in the table but thats not the case. cds column is the output –  Geo Papas Nov 24 '12 at 20:24
    
i think its wrong usage of having. having is only applied in the output of a query not in the server. –  Geo Papas Nov 24 '12 at 20:27
    
@GeoPapas HAVING is applied after aggregates, so after the COUNT(*) but still on the server, not your application code. It does work, as demonstrated in the SQLFiddle link. And what do you mean it supposes CDs already exist? The value will be correct no matter how many you have in the table. Test by deleting rows from the example in SQLFiddle. For example: sqlfiddle.com/#!2/b1f37/1 –  Michael Berkowski Nov 24 '12 at 20:35
show 6 more comments

Well only select the first then:

select Top 1 etaireia ,count(all code_cd) as cds
from cd_production
group by etaireia

Disregard, as you dont want to use the limitation.

share|improve this answer
    
doesnt seem to work the 'Top' keyword. :( maybe its not supported by the db –  Geo Papas Nov 24 '12 at 19:38
1  
mysql doesn't use TOP, besides that's the same intention as using LIMIT, which OP requested not to use –  Bohemian Nov 24 '12 at 19:58
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