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I have hex rgb color and black-white mask. It's two integer arrays:

mColors = new int[] {
                 0xFFFF0000, 0xFFFF00FF, 0xFF0000FF, 0xFF00FFFF, 0xFF00FF00,
                 0xFFFFFF00, 0xFFFF0000
             };
mColorsMask = new int[] {
                     0xFFFFFFFF, 0xFF000000, 0xFFFFFFFF, 0xFF000000, 0xFFFFFFFF,
                     0xFFFFFFFF, 0xFF000000
                 };

I need to convert my color to black value depending on contrast. Contrast is integer value in a range from 0 to 255: enter image description here

With white all is fine, I make byte addition:

int newHexColor = (contrast << 16) | (contrast << 8) | contrast | mColors[i];
newColorsArray[i] = mode;

How to convert it to black?

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I'm not entirely sure of the question here -- mostly the relationships between stuff. You have an example of what should be black? –  cHao Nov 24 '12 at 20:54
    
No, I haven't. I should change values of seekBar, and my gradient should turn into the black-white. I made color-white change, but I can't made color-black change. –  Leo Nov 24 '12 at 21:03
    
And should the black/white value be related to the mask value, or...? –  cHao Nov 24 '12 at 21:04
    
Here it is used for an example. Actually the mask is contrast value. 1,3,5,7 elements from mColors array turn into white and 2,4,6 turn into black. –  Leo Nov 24 '12 at 21:08
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You might look into using the HSB color space. It seems much more suited to what you're trying to do. In particular, you see those angles that end up black in your "what i want" image? Those correspond to "hues" at 60, 180, and 300 degrees (1.0/6, 3.0/6, and 5.0/6 in Java). The white corresponds to 0, 120, and 240 degrees (0, 1.0/3, and 2.0/3 in Java) -- and not coincidentally, the colors at those angles are primary colors (that is, two of the three RGB components are zero).

What you'd do is find the difference between your color's hue and the nearest primary color. (Should be less than 1/6.) Scale it up (multiplying by 6 should do it), to give you a value between 0 and 1.0. That will give you an "impurity" value, which is basically the deviation from the nearest primary color. Of course, that number subtracted from 1.0 gives you the "purity", or the closeness to a primary color.

You can create a greyscale color based on the impurity or purity by using the respective value as the R, G, and B, with an alpha of 1.0f.

public Color getMaskColor(Color c) {
    float[] hsv = Color.RGBtoHSB(c.getRed(), c.getGreen(), c.getBlue(), null);
    float hue = hsv[0];

    // 0, 1/3, and 2/3 are the primary colors.  Find the closest one to c,
    // by rounding c to the nearest third.
    float nearestPrimaryHue = Math.round(hue * 3.0f) / 3.0f;

    // difference between hue and nearestPrimaryHue <= 1/6
    // Multiply by 6 to get a value between 0 and 1.0
    float impurity = Math.abs(hue - nearestPrimaryHue) * 6.0f;
    float purity = 1.0f - impurity;

    // return a greyscale color based on the "purity"
    // (for #FF0000, would return white)
    // using impurity would return black instead
    return new Color(purity, purity, purity, 1.0f);
}

You could either use a color component of the returned color as the "contrast" value, or change the function so that it returns the "purity" or "impurity" as needed.

Note, the math gets wonky with greyscale colors. (The way Java calculates HSB, pure greys are just reds (hue=0) with no tint (saturation=0). The only component that changes is the brightness.) But since your color wheel doesn't have greyscale colors...

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You can make the image black n white using contrast.

See the code..

public static Bitmap createContrast(Bitmap src, double value) {
    // image size
    int width = src.getWidth();
    int height = src.getHeight();
    // create output bitmap
    Bitmap bmOut = Bitmap.createBitmap(width, height, src.getConfig());
    // color information
    int A, R, G, B;
    int pixel;
    // get contrast value
    double contrast = Math.pow((100 + value) / 100, 2);

    // scan through all pixels
    for(int x = 0; x < width; ++x) {
        for(int y = 0; y < height; ++y) {
            // get pixel color
            pixel = src.getPixel(x, y);
            A = Color.alpha(pixel);
            // apply filter contrast for every channel R, G, B
            R = Color.red(pixel);
            R = (int)(((((R / 255.0) - 0.5) * contrast) + 0.5) * 255.0);
            if(R < 0) { R = 0; }
            else if(R > 255) { R = 255; }

            G = Color.red(pixel);
            G = (int)(((((G / 255.0) - 0.5) * contrast) + 0.5) * 255.0);
            if(G < 0) { G = 0; }
            else if(G > 255) { G = 255; }

            B = Color.red(pixel);
            B = (int)(((((B / 255.0) - 0.5) * contrast) + 0.5) * 255.0);
            if(B < 0) { B = 0; }
            else if(B > 255) { B = 255; }

            // set new pixel color to output bitmap
            bmOut.setPixel(x, y, Color.argb(A, R, G, B));
        }
    }

    return bmOut;
 }

Set the double value to 50 on method call. For Example createContrast(Bitmap src, 50)

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1  
How does this answer the question? –  Ixx Nov 24 '12 at 20:51
    
Sorry but I have not understand question maybe update helps you. –  Artyom Kiriliyk Nov 24 '12 at 21:06
    
No, it doesn't work. See upd –  Leo Nov 24 '12 at 21:18
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