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For some reason enabling alpha blending results in me not being able to draw run-of-the-mill coloured shapes. The order in which everything is drawn makes no difference. Even if the only thing being drawn is the coloured shape, it still won't show.

Disabling alpha blending fixes this, but disables alpha blending (obviously). This leads me to believe the problem is in how I'm initializing openGL.

The textured objects are contained in the world, which is commented out. Commenting "world.run();" out makes no difference, only disabling alpha blending does.

public class Core {

int width=800, height=600;

//World world;

public void Start(){

    try {
        Display.setDisplayMode(new DisplayMode(width,height));
        Display.create();
    } catch (LWJGLException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        System.exit(0);
    }

    initGL();
    System.out.println("OpenGL version: " + GL11.glGetString(GL11.GL_VERSION));

    boolean Close = Display.isCloseRequested();

    //world = new World(width, height);

    while(!Close){
        GL11.glClear(GL11.GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL11.GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT);

        if(Keyboard.isKeyDown(Keyboard.KEY_ESCAPE) || Display.isCloseRequested())
            Close = true;


        //world.run();
        GL11.glColor4d(1, 0, 0, 1);
        GL11.glBegin(GL11.GL_QUADS);
        GL11.glVertex2d(0, 0);
        GL11.glVertex2d(0, 50);
        GL11.glVertex2d(50, 50);
        GL11.glVertex2d(50, 0);
        GL11.glEnd();

        Display.update();
        //Display.sync(60);
    }

}

public void initGL(){
    GL11.glEnable(GL11.GL_TEXTURE_2D);               

    GL11.glClearColor(1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f);          

        // enable alpha blending
        GL11.glEnable(GL11.GL_BLEND);
        GL11.glBlendFunc(GL11.GL_SRC_ALPHA, GL11.GL_ONE_MINUS_SRC_ALPHA);

        GL11.glViewport(0,0,width,height);

    GL11.glMatrixMode(GL11.GL_MODELVIEW);
    GL11.glMatrixMode(GL11.GL_PROJECTION);
    GL11.glLoadIdentity();
    GL11.glOrtho(0, width, height, 0, 1, -1);
    GL11.glMatrixMode(GL11.GL_MODELVIEW);
}

public static void main(String args[]){
    Core m = new Core();
    m.Start();
}

}

This is for a 2D app where I'm trying to draw metaballs behind the texture of a black-and-white world map.

Run-of-the-mill coloured shapes refers to the following,

GL11.glColor4d(1, 0, 0, 1);
GL11.glBegin(GL11.GL_QUADS);
    GL11.glVertex2d(0, 0);
    GL11.glVertex2d(0, 50);
    GL11.glVertex2d(50, 50);
    GL11.glVertex2d(50, 0);
GL11.glEnd();

Even if drawn on its own, as long as alpha blending is enabled, it won't show up.

UPDATE: The constructor for world was loading (but not drawing) a texture. Removing that part of the code lets the coloured square show up. I have deduced that the problem will occur as long as a texture is loaded, regardless of whether it is displayed or not.

share|improve this question
    
What about disabling depth testing? I know it's 2D but it may still matter. –  zero298 Nov 24 '12 at 22:25
    
How do you do that? Sorry, I'm somewhat new to this. –  Babar Shariff Nov 24 '12 at 22:35
    
GL11.glDisable(GL11.GL_DEPTH_TEST);. But it's disabled by default. –  Thomas Nov 24 '12 at 22:36
    
It made no difference. –  Babar Shariff Nov 24 '12 at 22:38
    
I don't see anything wrong in this code that woulde explain the behaviour your describe. Could you provide a minimal example? (You may well find the problem yourself while doing so!) –  Thomas Nov 24 '12 at 22:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You've got glEnable(GL_TEXTURE_2D) in initGL, but I don't see it disabled anywhere.

You know you have to disable texturing if you want to draw an untextured object, right?

share|improve this answer
    
That, I did not know. Is there any way to textured and untextured objects at the same time? Or is using textured single colour objects the only way to go about it? –  Babar Shariff Nov 24 '12 at 23:35
    
@BabarShariff: The color is multiplied by the texture so you can have a bit of solid white texture in your atlas to use for solid color shapes. –  Ben Jackson Nov 24 '12 at 23:45

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