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Using C++, I would like to create an instance of a vector object input, as shown in the main() function of the test program below. The input vector is filled with data, and then passed by reference to a compute() function. The compute function is to return two vector objects real and imag.

Is it possible to return these two vector objects in the manner shown in the code snippet below?

Compiling this code using gcc gives the following errors:

In function ‘void compute(const std::vector<double>&, std::vector<double>&, std::vector<double>&)’:
error: declaration of ‘std::vector<double> real’ shadows a parameter
error: declaration of ‘std::vector<double> imag’ shadows a parameter

Perhaps there is a better way to do this? Here is the complete test program:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

void compute(const std::vector<double> &input,
                    std::vector<double> &real, std::vector<double> &imag)
{
        unsigned int N = input.size();
        unsigned int csize = (N / 2) + 1;

        // the error occurs here
        std::vector<double> real(csize);
        std::vector<double> imag(csize);

        for (int i = 0; i < csize; i++)
        {
            real[i] = input[i] * i;
            imag[i] = input[i] * -i;
        }
 } // end


int main()
{
    const int num = 10;
    std::vector<double> input(num);
    for(int i = 0; i < num; i++)
        input[i] = i;

    std::vector<double> real;
    std::vector<double> imag;

    compute(input, real, imag);

 } // end
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The vectors already exist and so you don't want to create them again, instead resize them to be the proper size:

real.resize(csize);
imag.resize(csize);

Your code was actually valid, but since you're compiling on -Werror it's rejected. By "shadowing" it means that you would be creating and modifying vectors local to the function and so the ones passed by reference wouldn't have been updated.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Pubby! Just out of curiosity, is the resize() done in an efficient manner? Or would it be better to simply set the size of the vector when the instance is created? –  Nicholas Kinar Nov 24 '12 at 22:55
1  
@NicholasKinar It may involve an unnecessary memcpy but it's not a huge problem. I would change the function to use iterators which has the benefit of being more general and better performance. –  Pubby Nov 24 '12 at 22:57
    
So rather than using a for loop, an iterator would be used? The use of an iterator still does not eliminate the need for a resize? –  Nicholas Kinar Nov 24 '12 at 23:00
    
No, the use of an iterator is only for iterating through the vector. A resize is still needed before use of the iterator. –  Nicholas Kinar Nov 24 '12 at 23:33
    
@NicholasKinar For clarification, you wouldn't resize the vector inside the function. The vector would be resized before or use a back_inserter iterator. –  Pubby Nov 25 '12 at 0:48

Change "compute" to:

void compute(const std::vector<double> &input,
                std::vector<double> &real, std::vector<double> &imag)
{
    unsigned int N = input.size();
    unsigned int csize = (N / 2) + 1;

    real.resize(csize);
    imag.resize(csize);

    for (int i = 0; i < csize; i++)
    {
        real[i] = input[i] * i;
        imag[i] = input[i] * -i;
    }
} // end
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! This is a good answer as well, and shows where the resize should be done in the code. –  Nicholas Kinar Nov 24 '12 at 22:56

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