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I have a web page where a javascript calculation in a function takes lot of time to finish and makes the page to freeze. What technique should I use to make sure the javascript does not freeze the browser when the calculation is happening in the background?

This was a javascript performance issue question without the source code asked in an interview. I am not able to answer that. Please let me know if you have any concrete answer for it.

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4  
include your javascript source code. –  RezaSh Nov 24 '12 at 22:55
2  
Sounds like a nice use case for web workers. –  James McLaughlin Nov 24 '12 at 22:56
    
Let's have a look at the existing code. The community can't make suggestions without seeing what you have already. –  ajtrichards Nov 24 '12 at 22:56
7  
Read his question. There is no code to look at. He's asking for general advice based on an interview question. –  Geuis Nov 24 '12 at 22:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If you only need to do a calculation and don't need to access the DOM during the long running calculation, then you have two options:

  1. You can break the calculation up into pieces and do a piece at a time on a setTimeout(). On each setTimeout() call, the browser will be free to serve other events and will keep the page alive and responive. When you finish the last piece of the calculation, you can then carry out the result.
  2. You can run the calculation in the background using a webworker in modern browsers. When the calcuation is done in the webworker, it sends a message back to the main thread and you can then update the DOM with the result.

Here's a related answer that also shows an example: Best way to iterate over an array without blocking the UI

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Thanks Jfriend00 +1 ed –  Ravi Nov 24 '12 at 22:59
3  
+1 for usage of web workers –  Jonathan Newmuis Nov 24 '12 at 23:00
1  
Added reference to another related answer that has some examples of using setTimeout(). –  jfriend00 Nov 24 '12 at 23:06
    
Accepted.Today I learned something new about webworkers and making use of setTimeout(). –  Ravi Nov 24 '12 at 23:10

Some browsers have only one thread for running your code and updating the UI (in other words, until the calculation is complete, the browser will appear "frozen"). You'll want to try to perform the action asynchronously, in one way or another.

If the calculation is really expensive, you might want to make a call to the server and let the server do the calculation, and callback the client when the calculation is done.

If the calculation is kind of expensive, you can try to do it in chunks on the client. This isn't actually asynchronous (as the client will block while executing each chunk) but the goal is to make the chunks small enough that the blocking is not noticeable.

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Thanks Jonathan. –  Ravi Nov 24 '12 at 23:00

Let me elaborate on @jfriend00's answer by giving a concrete stripped down example. Here is a long-running JavaScript process that can be started by clicking a button. Once it runs, it freezes the browser. The process consists of a long loop that repeats some workload where one iteration takes comparatively little time.

Due to the browser freeze, debugging a script like this is not easy. One alternative to avoid browser freeze is using a web worker. The drawback of that approach is the poor debuggabilty of web workers per se: Tools like Firebug are not supported.

<html>
<head>
    <script>
        var Process = function(start) {
            this.start = start;
        }

        Process.prototype.run = function(stop) {
            // Long-running loop
            for (var i = this.start; i < stop; i++) {
                // Inside the loop there is some workload which 
                // is the code that is to be debugged
                console.log(i);
            }
        }

        var p = new Process(100);

        window.onload = function() {
            document.getElementById("start").onclick = function() {
                p.run(1000000000);
            }
        }
    </script>
</head>
<body>
    <input id="start" type="button" value="Start" />
</body>
</html>

Using a Queue data structure (e.g. http://code.stephenmorley.org/javascript/queues/), an interval timer and some small modification to the control flow of the original process one can build a GUI that doesn't freeze the browser, leaves the process fully debuggable and even allows additional features like stepping, pausing and stopping.

Here is how it goes:

<html>
<head>
    <script src="http://code.stephenmorley.org/javascript/queues/Queue.js"></script>
    <script>
        // The GUI controlling process execution
        var Gui = function(start) {
            this.timer = null; // timer to check for inputs and/or commands for the process
            this.carryOn = false; // used to start/pause/stop process execution
            this.cmdQueue = new Queue(); // data structure that holds the commands 
            this.p = null; // process instance
            this.start = start;
            this.i = start; // input to the modified process 
        }

        Gui.prototype = {
            /**
             * Receives a command and initiates the corresponding action 
             */
            executeCmd: function(cmd) {
                switch (cmd.action) {
                    case "initialize":
                        this.p = new Process(this);
                        break;
                    case "process":
                        this.p.run(cmd.i);
                        break;
                }
            },

            /*
             * Places next command into the command queue
             */
            nextInput: function() {
                this.cmdQueue.enqueue({
                    action: "process",
                    i: this.i++
                });
            }
        }

        // The modified loop-like process
        var Process = function(gui) {
            this.gui = gui;
        }

        Process.prototype.run = function(i) {
            // The workload from the original process above
            console.log(i);

            // The loop itself is controlled by the GUI
            if (this.gui.carryOn) {
                this.gui.nextInput();
            }
        }

        // Event handlers for GUI interaction
        window.onload = function() {

            var gui = new Gui(100);

            document.getElementById("init").onclick = function() {
                gui.cmdQueue.enqueue({ // first command will instantiate the process
                    action: "initialize"
                });

                // Periodically check the command queue for commands
                gui.timer = setInterval(function() {
                    if (gui.cmdQueue.peek() !== undefined) {
                        gui.executeCmd(gui.cmdQueue.dequeue());
                    }
                }, 4);
            }

            document.getElementById("step").onclick = function() {
                gui.carryOn = false; // execute just one step
                gui.nextInput();
            }

            document.getElementById("run").onclick = function() {
                gui.carryOn = true; // (restart) and execute until further notice
                gui.nextInput();
            }

            document.getElementById("pause").onclick = function() {
                gui.carryOn = false; // pause execution
            }

            document.getElementById("stop").onclick = function() {
                gui.carryOn = false; // stop execution and clean up 
                gui.i = gui.start;
                clearInterval(gui.timer)

                while (gui.cmdQueue.peek()) {
                    gui.cmdQueue.dequeue();
                }
            }
        }
    </script>
</head>
<body>
    <input id="init" type="button" value="Init" />
    <input id="step" type="button" value="Step" />
    <input id="run" type="button" value="Run" />
    <input id="pause" type="button" value="Pause" />
    <input id="stop" type="button" value="Stop" />
</body>
</html>

While this approach certainly doesn't fit all long-running scripts one can think of, it certainly can be adapted to any loop-like scenario. I'm using it to port Numenta's HTM/CLA artificial intelligence algorithms to the browser.

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