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I need to store these types of events for let's say uploaded song:

  • Views
  • Likes
  • Dislikes
  • Comments
  • Favorites
  • Downloads

And there might be even more.

To store information about song itself I am using wide rows, where column name is timestamp and value is JSON string with all information about that song.

Now there wouldn't be much of the problem if i would only need to store numbers, but i actually need to store information about the user who say liked that song.

So if 1000 users liked some song putting all of that info in just one column would probably be a bad idea.

So the only way i could probably do that is to store that information in a different CF.

But i'm not sure how would "connect" song itself with all that info scattered in different column/s?

So my question is, am i going in the right direction, and if so how would i store all those actions and connect them together.

EDIT

I am trying to build likes system, and it's getting almost out of hand, these are the actions i need to perform in order to like/dislike

  1. Check if user already liked that item
  2. Check if user disliked that item before
  3. If he did dislike, then remove that entry
  4. Now get current likes
  5. And now update item itself, set new likes count
  6. Update CF which contains all user who liked that item

And there is actually couple more querys that i need to run, so in total i get almost 6 querys or even more is that normal?

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+100

Knowing what you need to query is one of, if not the single most, important consideration when planning a Cassandra schema. Cassandra is designed to handle a high volume of writes.

Depending on what other features you want to implement, you may need to create additional column families or replace these entirely to store the data in the manner most optimized for cassandra to query.

Further, I recommend storing as much of the data in natively in cassandra as is possible. I wouldn't load a JSON object into a fat string column. At the very least, store pertinent data directly in cassandra, such as values of likes, etc.

You have two domain models, User and Song, and three classes of data you want to store:

  1. Comments
  2. Likes/Dislikes/Favorites
  3. Views/Downloads

And you detail some functional queries needed for your update algorithm:

  1. Check if user already liked that item
  2. Check if user disliked that item before
  3. If he did dislike, then remove that entry
  4. Now get current likes
  5. And now update item itself, set new likes count
    • using cassandra counters, both these steps can happen at once
  6. Update CF which contains all user who liked that item

A schema that can satisfy those query requirements follows.

First, we'll define the CFs for User and Song, both of which use UUID as keys.

create column family users with comparator=UTF8Type
   and column_metadata=[{column_name: user_name, validation_class: UTF8Type, index_type: KEYS},
   {column_name: json_data, validation_class: UTF8Type}];

create column family songs with comparator=UTF8Type
   and column_metadata=[{column_name: user_name, validation_class: UTF8Type, index_type: KEYS},
      {column_name: json_data, validation_class: UTF8Type}];

The secondary index helps to retrieve the user row by username. See this for performance considerations.


Comments could be modeled using a UUID for each comment as key as follows:

create column family comments with comparator = 'UTF8Type' 
   and column_metadata=[{column_name: user, validation_class: UUIDType, index_type: KEYS},
      {column_name: song, validation_class: UUIDType, index_type: KEYS},
      {column_name: timestamp, validation_class: DateType},
      {column_name: comment, validation_class: UTF8Type}];

Since user's likes and dislikes are mutually exclusive, we can use one column family to store all the user's song likes/dislikes. If you constrain Favorite to imply like, we can do all three with just this one. Using the user's UUID as the row key, and song's UUID as the column key, a column value of 0 => no value, 1 => dislike, 2 => like, 3 => favorite.

create column family user_likes with comparator = 'UUIDType'
   and default_validation_class = IntegerType;

All that's left now is tracking the total likes, dislikes, favorites, views, and downloads per song. We can use Cassandra's counter column type to accomplish this in one CF. Use the song's UUID as the CF key.

create column family song_data with default_validation_class=CounterColumnType
   and column_metadata=[{column_name: likes},
      {column_name: dislikes},
      {column_name: favorites},
      {column_name: views},
      {column_name: downloads}];
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Thanks that's very useful, thou i did it already in a bit different way, but i'll look at what could be improved. –  Linas Dec 2 '12 at 13:09
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Create different column families for "User, Song, Song_Likes, User_Likes, Song_ Dislike, User_Dislike" use songId (UUID) and UserId (UUID) to establish like between column families.

CF
 User: KS {userId} -> {{user}, {JSON user Info}}
 Song: KS {songId} -> {{song}, {JSON song Info}}

 Song_Comments: {songId -> {(Reversed)timestamp, userUUID:UserName:comment}}
  Reveresed Time stamp can help you to get latest N comments quickly.

 Song_Likes: {songId -> {timeStamp, userUUID}}
   (or if time of event is not important.)
 Song_Likes: {songId -> {userUUID, column Data {....} }

 similarly for other Column Families.

The below like may be helpful to you. http://www.rackspace.com/blog/cassandra-by-example/

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In casandra you cannot perform joins so you have to denormalize data instead. So the idea is to keep entities and relations in separate Column Families. Also keep in mind cassandra does have super columns, that is very helpful when you want to go one level deep, so you have all together. Also don't miss cassandra limitations - depends on version you use.

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