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Is it possible to move/rename files in git and maintain their history?

I am a previous subversion user, not sure how git could help me in following situation.

I have a git repository where my project was contained having multiple dirs, I've been making several commits over this structure

Now I need to make structure changes, so that I move all folders/files at root to a new folder, and I still want to keep commit history of files.

so for example in my repo I currently have a structure like this

src
res
xml
file.txt
.gitignore

I want all of them to be moved in a folder called common, so that I have following structure at the root of repo

common
.gitignore

Is it possible , if so how ?

Thank you

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marked as duplicate by Ryan Bigg, poke, Jonathan Leffler, Peter O., Chris Gerken Nov 25 '12 at 2:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Don't think its duplicate of the reference you gave, the questioner there already seems to know what I want to know. hence the answers there are based on that assumption. –  Ahmed Nov 24 '12 at 23:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could use commands like this

mkdir common
git mv src res xml file.txt common

This moves the files and you can still see the history with git log --follow common/file.txt. If you'd rather rewrite history, check out How can I rewrite history so that all files are in a subdirectory?

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is a commit not required ? –  Ahmed Nov 24 '12 at 23:39
mkdir common
git mv src res xml file.txt common
git commit
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This won't maintain the history for these files. You would need to git log --follow to see the history. –  Ryan Bigg Nov 24 '12 at 23:34
4  
Yes, it will. Or rather it can't because git does not track per-file history. It always tracks the history of the whole repository. –  melpomene Nov 24 '12 at 23:36

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