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The following code using casper.js doesn't output This is thenEvaluate string because Twitter.com disabled console.log (empty function):

var casper = require('casper').create({
    verbose: false,
    logLevel: 'debug'
});

casper.start("http://twitter.com");

casper.on('remote.message', function(msg) {
    this.echo('remote message caught: ' + msg);
})

casper.thenEvaluate(function() {
    console.log('This is thenEvaluate');
});

casper.run();

If I swapped the url to google.com or any other website, it works. My question is:

  1. For website disabled console.log, is there a way to re-enable it?

  2. If NO for #1, is there a way to do any kind of log at all within evaluate() or thenEvaluate() function?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Not particularly a solution, but try using console.info - I've worked on some servers where theyve disabled console.log but forgot about console.info (which works well in Firefox) –  netpoetica Nov 25 '12 at 0:11
    
Twitter.com didn't forget to disable console.info :P But you sure there is no way to debug or log in such site? Right now I can only do capture() and view .png which is painful. –  HP. Nov 25 '12 at 0:16

3 Answers 3

visual assert

You may want to consider building an assert widget which will append a sort of visual console.log effect to the DOM, and then you could output text. I have a Gist on Github where I've implemented something like that for situations like this: https://gist.github.com/3773871

If you just call in that code to your program, you could use

assert(true, 'This is thenEvaluate()')

Obviously, you're not really using it as assert proper, but if you just pass in true and a string and call it in place of your console log, it will output your result to an absolutely positioning element on the top right of the screen for reading.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried that just now using casper.js and a disabled console.log website, it doesn't work. The code seems to just insert some elements into the DOM and still use console.log at the end. I am wondering if there is a way to get the code for original console.log function? –  HP. Nov 25 '12 at 0:22
    
Hey HP - it will insert elements to the DOM, and it will console log, but it will also add some text to the inserted DOM elements like you see in that screenshot. If console.log is disabled, that means there is some code in the Twitter JS files that is redefining the function to a blank function. The actual console.log code is probably native code - I looked around, couldn't find the original code. –  netpoetica Nov 25 '12 at 0:31
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I found the answer here about Restoring console.log()

var i = document.createElement('iframe');
i.style.display = 'none';
document.body.appendChild(i);
window.console = i.contentWindow.console;
share|improve this answer
    
Lol - this is VERY slick. Glad you found it –  netpoetica Nov 25 '12 at 0:33
    
You should have it in your Gist code for safety lol –  HP. Nov 25 '12 at 1:20

Just delete the log property of the console object:

>>> console.log('plop')
undefined
>>> delete console.log
true
>>> console.log('plop')
plop
undefined

That could give with casper:

var casper = require('casper').create();

casper.start("http://twitter.com");

casper.on('remote.message', function(msg) {
    this.echo('remote message caught: ' + msg);
})

casper.thenEvaluate(function() {
    delete console.log;
    console.log('This is thenEvaluate');
});

casper.run();

Disclaimer: answer was found here, original author should be credited accordingly.

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