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I have data that I want to reformat in unix, taking columns 2-3 to make a new column (called when in the example), but am having trouble figuring out how to do this. Without changing columns 4-7, which together serve as the identifier for the data, I want to print column 2 the number of times specified in column 3, then print a value (31 in this example) N (= column 1 for each identifier) minus (the sum of column 3 for each identifier) number of times. So the reformatted data will have a total of N number of lines for each identifier. The data to start with looks like this:

N   time    awake   line    sex temp    rep
9   15  1   188 f   25  1
9   20  1   188 f   25  1
9   21  1   188 f   25  1
9   28  1   188 f   25  1
10  12  1   205 m   25  1   
10  14  3   205 m   25  1   
10  16  1   205 m   25  1   
10  18  1   205 m   25  1   
10  19  2   205 m   25  1   
10  22  1   205 m   25  1   
10  24  1   205 m   25  1   

The reformatted data should hopefully look something like this:

line    sex temp    rep when
188 f   25  1   15
188 f   25  1   20
188 f   25  1   21
188 f   25  1   28
188 f   25  1   31
188 f   25  1   31
188 f   25  1   31
188 f   25  1   31
188 f   25  1   31
205 m   25  1   12
205 m   25  1   14
205 m   25  1   14
205 m   25  1   14
205 m   25  1   16
205 m   25  1   18
205 m   25  1   19
205 m   25  1   19
205 m   25  1   22
205 m   25  1   24

My guess is that it requires some sort of loop, I think the pseudocode would look something like this:

for (each columns 4-7)
    tot = (column 1)
    rem = tot - sum (column 3)
    for (i=0; i <= column 3; i++)
        print column 2"\n"
    for (j=0; i <= rem; j++)
        print "31\n"

Any help is much appreciated!

Edited to add: I've tried modifying the perl code from @mvp below but it's not quite right. I used awk to reformat the original columns 4-7 into a single field (and variable) called id. Any comments?

print "id       when\n"; # output header
my $temp='188.f.25.1';
my $count;
my $rest;
my $total;
while(my $input = <>) {
    my ($n, $time, $awake, $id)
        = split /\s+/, $input; # read each line
    next if $n eq 'N'; # skip input header line
    if ($id eq $temp) {
        $count++;
        for (1..$awake) {print "$id     $time\n";}
        $total = $n;
        next;
    }
    else {
        $rest=$total-$count;
        for (1..$rest) {print "$temp    31\n";}
    }
    $count=0;
    $temp = $id;
    next;
}

And the modified input file:

N       time    awake   line.sex.temp.rep
9       15      1       188.f.25.1
9       20      1       188.f.25.1
9       21      1       188.f.25.1
9       28      1       188.f.25.1
10      12      1       205.m.25.1
10      14      3       205.m.25.1
10      16      1       205.m.25.1
10      18      1       205.m.25.1
10      19      2       205.m.25.1
10      22      1       205.m.25.1
10      24      1       205.m.25.1
10      10      1       206.m.25.1
10      14      1       206.m.25.1
10      18      1       206.m.25.1
10      20      1       206.m.25.1
10      24      1       206.m.25.1
10      26      1       206.m.25.1
10      27      1       206.m.25.1
10      28      2       206.m.25.1
share|improve this question
    
So with the new data format, what's your desired output? –  Kenosis Nov 26 '12 at 4:56
    
@Kenosis The desired output is actually the same, except at least initially the first four columns of the original desired output would be a single field separated by periods, that I would've re-separated using awk (due to my being a newbie, couldn't really figure out how to do this all at once) –  suegene Nov 26 '12 at 16:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's one way using awk. It uses the unmodified input file. Run like:

awk -f script.awk file{,} | column -t

Contents of script.awk:

BEGIN {
    print "line sex temp rep when"
}

FNR==NR && NR>1 {
    a[$4,$5,$6,$7]+=$3
    next
}

FNR>1 {
    for (i=1;i<=$3;i++) {
        print x=($4 FS $5 FS $6 FS $7), $2
        a[$4,$5,$6,$7]--
        var++
    }

    if (a[$4,$5,$6,$7]==0) { 
        for (i=1;i<=$1-var;i++) {
            print x, "31"
        }
        var=0
    }
}

Results:

line  sex  temp  rep  when
188   f    25    1    15
188   f    25    1    20
188   f    25    1    21
188   f    25    1    28
188   f    25    1    31
188   f    25    1    31
188   f    25    1    31
188   f    25    1    31
188   f    25    1    31
205   m    25    1    12
205   m    25    1    14
205   m    25    1    14
205   m    25    1    14
205   m    25    1    16
205   m    25    1    18
205   m    25    1    19
205   m    25    1    19
205   m    25    1    22
205   m    25    1    24

Alternatively, here's the one-liner:

awk 'BEGIN { print "line sex temp rep when" } FNR==NR && NR>1 { a[$4,$5,$6,$7]+=$3; next } FNR>1 { for (i=1;i<=$3;i++) { print x=($4 FS $5 FS $6 FS $7), $2; a[$4,$5,$6,$7]--; var++ } if (a[$4,$5,$6,$7]==0) { for (i=1;i<=$1-var;i++) print x, "31"; var=0 } }' file{,} | column -t
share|improve this answer
    
Fantastic, thanks so much! –  suegene Nov 26 '12 at 16:46
    
would you mind commenting on what this does?: a[$4,$5,$6,$7]-- –  suegene Nov 26 '12 at 17:53
    
@suegene: Not a problem; a[$4,$5,$6,$7]-- simply decrements (by one) the multidimensional array holding columns 4,5,6 and 7. –  Steve Nov 26 '12 at 22:59
1  
Thanks, I think I finally got it, didn't realize how the array was structured until just now. very nice! –  suegene Nov 27 '12 at 4:53
perl -F -lane 'if($.==1){print "@F[3,4,5,6,1]"}for($i=0;$i<$F[2];$i++){print "@F[3,4,5,6,1]"}' your_file

or you could also use this:

perl -F -lane 'for($i=0;($i<$F[2])||($.==1);$i++){print "@F[3,4,5,6,1]";if($.==1){last}}' your_file

Tested below:

> cat temp
N       time    awake   line    sex     temp    rep
9       15      1       188     f       25      1
9       20      1       188     f       25      1
9       21      1       188     f       25      1
9       28      1       188     f       25      1
10      12      1       205     m       25      1
10      14      3       205     m       25      1
10      16      1       205     m       25      1
10      18      1       205     m       25      1
10      19      2       205     m       25      1
10      22      1       205     m       25      1
10      24      1       205     m       25      1

Execution:

> perl -F -lane 'if($.==1){print "@F[3,4,5,6,1]"}for($i=0;$i<$F[2];$i++){print "@F[3,4,5,6,1]"}' temp
line sex temp rep time
188 f 25 1 15
188 f 25 1 20
188 f 25 1 21
188 f 25 1 28
205 m 25 1 12
205 m 25 1 14
205 m 25 1 14
205 m 25 1 14
205 m 25 1 16
205 m 25 1 18
205 m 25 1 19
205 m 25 1 19
205 m 25 1 22
205 m 25 1 24
> 
share|improve this answer

This is how I would do it in Perl:

Save this as myscript.pl:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

print "line    sex temp    rep when\n"; # output header
while(my $input = <>) {
    my ($n, $time, $awake, $line, $sex, $temp, $rep)
        = split /\s+/, $input;
    next if $n eq 'N'; # skip input header line
    for (1..$awake) {
        print "$line $sex  $temp $rep $time\n";
    }
}

Call it as myscript.pl <a.txt >b.txt

share|improve this answer
    
Would you mind expanding your answer to include how to read in the data file (we can call is a.txt) and output to the reformatted file (b.txt)? –  suegene Nov 25 '12 at 1:07
    
Added usage, please see my amended answer –  mvp Nov 25 '12 at 1:12
    
I've run the script and it looks like a partial solution so far. It doesn't address printing the lines to have the value "31" filled in the last column of the reformatted file. This is the output I'm getting (sorry, don't know how to get this to show up properly):205 m 25 1 14 205 m 25 1 16 205 m 25 1 18 205 m 25 1 19 205 m 25 1 19 205 m 25 1 22 205 m 25 1 24 206 m 25 1 10 206 m 25 1 14 206 m 25 1 18 206 m 25 1 20 206 m 25 1 24 206 m 25 1 26 206 m 25 1 27 206 m 25 1 28 206 m 25 1 28 –  suegene Nov 25 '12 at 1:21
    
I see, I completely missed that part. I can try to add this for you, or you can do it yourself - your pseudo-code has it already :-) –  mvp Nov 25 '12 at 1:30
    
ah, I'd definitely appreciate it if you'd add it, I'll try in the meanwhile to do it myself but I'm guessing my unfamiliarity with perl syntax is going to hamper me quite a bit. Specifically, I'm not sure at all how you'd get the sum of column 3. –  suegene Nov 25 '12 at 2:26

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