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Objective-C is a superset of ANSI C. In GNU C, you can nest one function in another function... like this ...

float E(float x)
{
    float F(float y) //objective-C compiler says expected ; at end of declaration
    {
        return x + y;
    }
    return F(3) + F(4);
}

Is it possible to do this in Objective-C?

I know about blocks and NSInvocation objects, which could simulate the above C code. But can you define a function within the lexical scope of another function in Objective-C? Something like ...

-(int) outer:(int)x
{
    -(int) inner:(int)y //use of undeclared identifier inner
    {
        return x * 3;
    }
    return inner(x);
}
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5  
“In C, you can nest one function in another function” No you can't. This is a GNU extension. –  Pascal Cuoq Nov 25 '12 at 1:01
    
@PascalCuoq thanks. I edited the question accordingly. –  akh2103 Nov 25 '12 at 1:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can't, but you can easily get the same behavior with block

int outer(int i)
{
    int (^inner)(int) = ^(int x)
    {
        return x * 3;
    };

    return inner(i);
}
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You can't simply because in ObjectiveC methods are attached to classes like in C++, this means that there is always an implicit self inside a function.

How are you supposed to invoke a function that is nested inside another one? Making it a class method doesn't make much sense. Only way to invoke it would be by having it static (but it's seems really over complicating it)

You should use blocks, that are available to C, C++ and ObjectiveC on OS X or something similar like functors if you are going ObjectiveC++.

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You are mixing terms in your first sentence. Methods and functions are two different things. The self pointer only applies to methods. Objective-C supports functions (which have no self pointer). Of course these functions are not tied to any class. I'm sure you know this but I wanted to clarify this for others. –  rmaddy Nov 25 '12 at 1:34
    
It supports C functions, since it's a superset of C, but it doesn't support ObjectiveC functions since they are methods necessarily. Hence ObjectiveC functions must be methods and always have self reference. Actually the given error if you try to declare a function with ObjectiveC syntax outside a class is missing context for method declaration. –  Jack Nov 25 '12 at 1:48

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